“Help, I’m Getting Bullied”: Examining Sequences of Teacher Support Messages Provided to Bullied Students

Carly M. Danielson, Susanne M. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many students who seek out teachers for help when getting bullied report receiving unhelpful support. We theorized that the placement of support types (emotional, informational, network) in a conversation influences participants’ (N = 640) supportiveness evaluations. Results suggest that 1) conversations with more than one support type were evaluated as most supportive; 2) conversations featuring network support anywhere were viewed as more supportive; and 3) the emotional support–only conversation was viewed as least supportive, whereas the emotional-and-network support conversation was viewed as most supportive. We end by providing useful information for bullied students’ postbullying adjustments and bullying education curricula for teachers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-132
Number of pages20
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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conversation
Students
teacher
Curricula
student
Education
education curriculum
exclusion
Emotion
evaluation
Evaluation
Bullying
Curriculum
Placement

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Optimal Matching
  • Social Ties
  • Support Providers
  • Supportive Communication

Cite this

“Help, I’m Getting Bullied” : Examining Sequences of Teacher Support Messages Provided to Bullied Students. / Danielson, Carly M.; Jones, Susanne M.

In: Western Journal of Communication, Vol. 83, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 113-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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