Heating induced near deep brain stimulation lead electrodes during magnetic resonance imaging with a 3 T transceive volume head coil

Devashish Shrivastava, Aviva Abosch, John Hughes, Ute Goerke, Lance Delabarre, Rachana Visaria, Noam Harel, J. Thomas Vaughan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Heating induced near deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead electrodes during magnetic resonance imaging with a 3 T transceive head coil was measured, modeled, and imaged in three cadaveric porcine heads (mean body weight = 85.47 ± 3.19kg, mean head weight = 5.78 ± 0.32kg). The effect of the placement of the extra-cranial portion of the DBS lead on the heating was investigated by looping the extra-cranial lead on the top, side, and back of the head, and placing it parallel to the coil's longitudinal axial direction. The heating was induced using a 641s long turbo spin echo sequence with the mean whole head average specific absorption rate of 3.16W kg 1. Temperatures were measured using fluoroptic probes at the scalp, first and second electrodes from the distal lead tip, and 6mm distal from electrode 1 (T 6mm). The heating was modeled using the maximum T 6mmand imaged using a proton resonance frequency shift-based MR thermometry method. Results showed that the heating was significantly reduced when the extra-cranial lead was placed in the longitudinal direction compared to the other placements (peak temperature change = 1.5-3.2°C versus 5.1-24.7°C). Thermal modeling and MR thermometry may be used together to determine the heating and improve patient safety online.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5651-5665
Number of pages15
JournalPhysics in Medicine and Biology
Volume57
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 7 2012

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