Hearing treatment for reducing cognitive decline

Design and methods of the Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders randomized controlled trial

ACHIEVE Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Hearing impairment is highly prevalent and independently associated with cognitive decline. The Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders study is a multicenter randomized controlled trial to determine efficacy of hearing treatment in reducing cognitive decline in older adults. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT03243422. Methods: Eight hundred fifty participants without dementia aged 70 to 84 years with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment recruited from four United States field sites and randomized 1:1 to a best-practices hearing intervention or health education control. Primary study outcome is 3-year change in global cognitive function. Secondary outcomes include domain-specific cognitive decline, incident dementia, brain structural changes on magnetic resonance imaging, health-related quality of life, physical and social function, and physical activity. Results: Trial enrollment began January 4, 2018 and is ongoing. Discussion: When completed in 2022, Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders study should provide definitive evidence of the effect of hearing treatment versus education control on cognitive decline in community-dwelling older adults with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-507
Number of pages9
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hearing
Randomized Controlled Trials
Hearing Loss
Health
Dementia
Independent Living
Therapeutics
Health Education
Practice Guidelines
Cognition
Quality of Life
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education
Cognitive Aging
Cognitive Dysfunction
Brain

Keywords

  • Clinical trials
  • Cognition
  • Dementia
  • Epidemiology
  • Hearing
  • Longitudinal study
  • Memory
  • Presbycusis

Cite this

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title = "Hearing treatment for reducing cognitive decline: Design and methods of the Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Introduction: Hearing impairment is highly prevalent and independently associated with cognitive decline. The Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders study is a multicenter randomized controlled trial to determine efficacy of hearing treatment in reducing cognitive decline in older adults. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT03243422. Methods: Eight hundred fifty participants without dementia aged 70 to 84 years with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment recruited from four United States field sites and randomized 1:1 to a best-practices hearing intervention or health education control. Primary study outcome is 3-year change in global cognitive function. Secondary outcomes include domain-specific cognitive decline, incident dementia, brain structural changes on magnetic resonance imaging, health-related quality of life, physical and social function, and physical activity. Results: Trial enrollment began January 4, 2018 and is ongoing. Discussion: When completed in 2022, Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders study should provide definitive evidence of the effect of hearing treatment versus education control on cognitive decline in community-dwelling older adults with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment.",
keywords = "Clinical trials, Cognition, Dementia, Epidemiology, Hearing, Longitudinal study, Memory, Presbycusis",
author = "{ACHIEVE Investigators} and Deal, {Jennifer A.} and Goman, {Adele M.} and Albert, {Marilyn S.} and Arnold, {Michelle L.} and Sheila Burgard and Theresa Chisolm and David Couper and Glynn, {Nancy W.} and Theresa Gmelin and Hayden, {Kathleen M.} and Thomas Mosley and Jim Pankow and Nicholas Reed and Sanchez, {Victoria A.} and {Richey Sharrett}, A. and Thomas, {Sonia D.} and Josef Coresh and Lin, {Frank R.}",
year = "2018",
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doi = "10.1016/j.trci.2018.08.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "499--507",
journal = "Alzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Hearing treatment for reducing cognitive decline

T2 - Design and methods of the Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders randomized controlled trial

AU - ACHIEVE Investigators

AU - Deal, Jennifer A.

AU - Goman, Adele M.

AU - Albert, Marilyn S.

AU - Arnold, Michelle L.

AU - Burgard, Sheila

AU - Chisolm, Theresa

AU - Couper, David

AU - Glynn, Nancy W.

AU - Gmelin, Theresa

AU - Hayden, Kathleen M.

AU - Mosley, Thomas

AU - Pankow, Jim

AU - Reed, Nicholas

AU - Sanchez, Victoria A.

AU - Richey Sharrett, A.

AU - Thomas, Sonia D.

AU - Coresh, Josef

AU - Lin, Frank R.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Introduction: Hearing impairment is highly prevalent and independently associated with cognitive decline. The Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders study is a multicenter randomized controlled trial to determine efficacy of hearing treatment in reducing cognitive decline in older adults. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT03243422. Methods: Eight hundred fifty participants without dementia aged 70 to 84 years with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment recruited from four United States field sites and randomized 1:1 to a best-practices hearing intervention or health education control. Primary study outcome is 3-year change in global cognitive function. Secondary outcomes include domain-specific cognitive decline, incident dementia, brain structural changes on magnetic resonance imaging, health-related quality of life, physical and social function, and physical activity. Results: Trial enrollment began January 4, 2018 and is ongoing. Discussion: When completed in 2022, Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders study should provide definitive evidence of the effect of hearing treatment versus education control on cognitive decline in community-dwelling older adults with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment.

AB - Introduction: Hearing impairment is highly prevalent and independently associated with cognitive decline. The Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders study is a multicenter randomized controlled trial to determine efficacy of hearing treatment in reducing cognitive decline in older adults. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT03243422. Methods: Eight hundred fifty participants without dementia aged 70 to 84 years with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment recruited from four United States field sites and randomized 1:1 to a best-practices hearing intervention or health education control. Primary study outcome is 3-year change in global cognitive function. Secondary outcomes include domain-specific cognitive decline, incident dementia, brain structural changes on magnetic resonance imaging, health-related quality of life, physical and social function, and physical activity. Results: Trial enrollment began January 4, 2018 and is ongoing. Discussion: When completed in 2022, Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders study should provide definitive evidence of the effect of hearing treatment versus education control on cognitive decline in community-dwelling older adults with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment.

KW - Clinical trials

KW - Cognition

KW - Dementia

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Hearing

KW - Longitudinal study

KW - Memory

KW - Presbycusis

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JO - Alzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions

JF - Alzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions

SN - 2352-8737

ER -