Healthcare provider advice on gestational weight gain: uncovering a need for more effective weight counselling.

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Abstract

Limited research has examined the factors related to knowledge of gestational weight gain (GWG) recommendations and the receipt of advice from healthcare providers regarding GWG recommendations among women with pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity. Women with pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity (N = 191) reported the amount of gestational weight they believed they should gain and that healthcare providers advised them to gain. Only 24% (n = 46) of women had a correct knowledge of GWG recommendations. Women were less likely to have a correct knowledge of GWG recommendations if they had pre-pregnancy obesity, were of a minority race, or were socioeconomically disadvantaged. Meanwhile, only 17% (n = 32) of women reported being correctly advised about GWG recommendations by healthcare providers. There were no differences between women who did and did not report being correctly advised about GWG recommendations from healthcare providers. These findings indicate that women with pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity lack knowledge of GWG recommendations and report being incorrectly advised about GWG recommendations from healthcare providers. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? Extant literature indicates that women's knowledge of gestational weight gain (GWG) recommendations and women's receipt of information from their healthcare providers regarding GWG recommendations are predictive of meeting the Institute of Medicine guidelines for GWG. What do the results of this study add? Findings from the present study indicate that the majority of women with pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity lack knowledge of GWG recommendations and report that education on GWG recommendations from healthcare providers is an aspect of their prenatal care that is largely insufficient. Although there were no differences between women who did and did not report being correctly advised about GWG recommendations by healthcare providers, women were less likely to have a correct knowledge of GWG recommendations if they had pre-pregnancy obesity, were of a minority race, or were socioeconomically disadvantaged. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practise and/or further research? These findings highlight a need for more effective tailoring of prenatal care to ensure that women receive accurate advice from healthcare providers regarding GWG recommendations.
Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 22 2018

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