Health Outcomes of Youth in Clinical Pediatric Weight Management Programs in POWER

POWER Work Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe treatment outcomes of children and adolescents enrolled in the Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry, a consortium of multicomponent pediatric weight management programs in the US. Study design: This multicenter prospective observational cohort study, established in 2013, includes youth (2-18 years of age) with obesity enrolled from 31 Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry (POWER) sites over a 2-year period and followed up to 12 months. Weight status was evaluated by the percentage of the 95th percentile for body mass index (%BMIp95). Associations of weight status outcomes with patient characteristics and program exposure were analyzed with multivariable mixed effects modeling. Results: We included 6454 children and adolescents (median age, 11 years; IQR, 9-14 years; 53% white, 32% Hispanic; 73% with severe obesity) who were enrolled in POWER. Median changes in %BMIp95 for this cohort were −1.88 (IQR, −5.8 to 1.4), −2.50 (IQR, −7.4 to 1.8), −2.86 (IQR, −8.7 to 1.9), at 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12 of months follow-up, respectively (all P <.05). Older age (≥12 years), greater severity of obesity, and Hispanic race/ethnicity were associated with better improvement in %BMIp95. A 5-percentage point decrease in %BMIp95 was associated with improvement in cardiometabolic risk factors. Conclusions: Overall, treatment in pediatric weight management programs is associated with a modest median decrease in BMI as measured by change in %BMIp95. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, as well as to identify additional strategies to enhance the effectiveness of these multicomponent interventions for youth with severe obesity. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02121132.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-65.e4
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume208
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Pediatric Obesity
Registries
Pediatrics
Weights and Measures
Health
Morbid Obesity
Hispanic Americans
Obesity
Observational Studies
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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Health Outcomes of Youth in Clinical Pediatric Weight Management Programs in POWER. / POWER Work Group.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 208, 01.05.2019, p. 57-65.e4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c3d264ca8ff947a4acb70eed179717df,
title = "Health Outcomes of Youth in Clinical Pediatric Weight Management Programs in POWER",
abstract = "Objective: To describe treatment outcomes of children and adolescents enrolled in the Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry, a consortium of multicomponent pediatric weight management programs in the US. Study design: This multicenter prospective observational cohort study, established in 2013, includes youth (2-18 years of age) with obesity enrolled from 31 Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry (POWER) sites over a 2-year period and followed up to 12 months. Weight status was evaluated by the percentage of the 95th percentile for body mass index ({\%}BMIp95). Associations of weight status outcomes with patient characteristics and program exposure were analyzed with multivariable mixed effects modeling. Results: We included 6454 children and adolescents (median age, 11 years; IQR, 9-14 years; 53{\%} white, 32{\%} Hispanic; 73{\%} with severe obesity) who were enrolled in POWER. Median changes in {\%}BMIp95 for this cohort were −1.88 (IQR, −5.8 to 1.4), −2.50 (IQR, −7.4 to 1.8), −2.86 (IQR, −8.7 to 1.9), at 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12 of months follow-up, respectively (all P <.05). Older age (≥12 years), greater severity of obesity, and Hispanic race/ethnicity were associated with better improvement in {\%}BMIp95. A 5-percentage point decrease in {\%}BMIp95 was associated with improvement in cardiometabolic risk factors. Conclusions: Overall, treatment in pediatric weight management programs is associated with a modest median decrease in BMI as measured by change in {\%}BMIp95. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, as well as to identify additional strategies to enhance the effectiveness of these multicomponent interventions for youth with severe obesity. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02121132.",
author = "{POWER Work Group} and Seema Kumar and King, {Eileen C.} and Christison, {Amy L.} and Kelly, {Aaron S.} and Ariza, {Adolfo J.} and Claudia Borzutzky and Suzanne Cuda and Kelly, {Aaron S} and I. Abraham-Pratt and L. Ali and S. Armstrong and H. Binns and J. Brubaker and A. Cristison and C. Fox and C. Gordon and S. Hendrix and D. Hes and Fox, {Claudia K} and M. Joseph and M. Heyrman and L. Liu and A. McClure and M. Hofley and S. Negrete and M. Novick and V. O'Hara and J. Rodrue and M. Santos and J. Stoll and W. Stratbucker and B. Sweeney and J. Tester and S. Walka and H. deHeer and S. Wallace and S. Walsh and C. Wittcopp and A. Weedn and J. Yee and B. Grace",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.12.049",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "208",
pages = "57--65.e4",
journal = "Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "0022-3476",
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T1 - Health Outcomes of Youth in Clinical Pediatric Weight Management Programs in POWER

AU - POWER Work Group

AU - Kumar, Seema

AU - King, Eileen C.

AU - Christison, Amy L.

AU - Kelly, Aaron S.

AU - Ariza, Adolfo J.

AU - Borzutzky, Claudia

AU - Cuda, Suzanne

AU - Kelly, Aaron S

AU - Abraham-Pratt, I.

AU - Ali, L.

AU - Armstrong, S.

AU - Binns, H.

AU - Brubaker, J.

AU - Cristison, A.

AU - Fox, C.

AU - Gordon, C.

AU - Hendrix, S.

AU - Hes, D.

AU - Fox, Claudia K

AU - Joseph, M.

AU - Heyrman, M.

AU - Liu, L.

AU - McClure, A.

AU - Hofley, M.

AU - Negrete, S.

AU - Novick, M.

AU - O'Hara, V.

AU - Rodrue, J.

AU - Santos, M.

AU - Stoll, J.

AU - Stratbucker, W.

AU - Sweeney, B.

AU - Tester, J.

AU - Walka, S.

AU - deHeer, H.

AU - Wallace, S.

AU - Walsh, S.

AU - Wittcopp, C.

AU - Weedn, A.

AU - Yee, J.

AU - Grace, B.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Objective: To describe treatment outcomes of children and adolescents enrolled in the Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry, a consortium of multicomponent pediatric weight management programs in the US. Study design: This multicenter prospective observational cohort study, established in 2013, includes youth (2-18 years of age) with obesity enrolled from 31 Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry (POWER) sites over a 2-year period and followed up to 12 months. Weight status was evaluated by the percentage of the 95th percentile for body mass index (%BMIp95). Associations of weight status outcomes with patient characteristics and program exposure were analyzed with multivariable mixed effects modeling. Results: We included 6454 children and adolescents (median age, 11 years; IQR, 9-14 years; 53% white, 32% Hispanic; 73% with severe obesity) who were enrolled in POWER. Median changes in %BMIp95 for this cohort were −1.88 (IQR, −5.8 to 1.4), −2.50 (IQR, −7.4 to 1.8), −2.86 (IQR, −8.7 to 1.9), at 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12 of months follow-up, respectively (all P <.05). Older age (≥12 years), greater severity of obesity, and Hispanic race/ethnicity were associated with better improvement in %BMIp95. A 5-percentage point decrease in %BMIp95 was associated with improvement in cardiometabolic risk factors. Conclusions: Overall, treatment in pediatric weight management programs is associated with a modest median decrease in BMI as measured by change in %BMIp95. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, as well as to identify additional strategies to enhance the effectiveness of these multicomponent interventions for youth with severe obesity. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02121132.

AB - Objective: To describe treatment outcomes of children and adolescents enrolled in the Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry, a consortium of multicomponent pediatric weight management programs in the US. Study design: This multicenter prospective observational cohort study, established in 2013, includes youth (2-18 years of age) with obesity enrolled from 31 Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry (POWER) sites over a 2-year period and followed up to 12 months. Weight status was evaluated by the percentage of the 95th percentile for body mass index (%BMIp95). Associations of weight status outcomes with patient characteristics and program exposure were analyzed with multivariable mixed effects modeling. Results: We included 6454 children and adolescents (median age, 11 years; IQR, 9-14 years; 53% white, 32% Hispanic; 73% with severe obesity) who were enrolled in POWER. Median changes in %BMIp95 for this cohort were −1.88 (IQR, −5.8 to 1.4), −2.50 (IQR, −7.4 to 1.8), −2.86 (IQR, −8.7 to 1.9), at 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12 of months follow-up, respectively (all P <.05). Older age (≥12 years), greater severity of obesity, and Hispanic race/ethnicity were associated with better improvement in %BMIp95. A 5-percentage point decrease in %BMIp95 was associated with improvement in cardiometabolic risk factors. Conclusions: Overall, treatment in pediatric weight management programs is associated with a modest median decrease in BMI as measured by change in %BMIp95. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, as well as to identify additional strategies to enhance the effectiveness of these multicomponent interventions for youth with severe obesity. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02121132.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.12.049

DO - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.12.049

M3 - Article

C2 - 30853195

AN - SCOPUS:85062476961

VL - 208

SP - 57-65.e4

JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

ER -