Health inequities in SARS-CoV-2 infection, seroprevalence, and COVID-19 vaccination: Results from the East Bay COVID-19 study

Cameron Adams, Mary Horton, Olivia Solomon, Marcus Wong, Sean L. Wu, Sophia Fuller, Xiaorong Shao, Indro Fedrigo, Hong L. Quach, Diana L. Quach, Michelle Meas, Luis Lopez, Abigail Broughton, Anna L. Barcellos, Joan Shim, Yusef Seymens, Samantha Hernandez, Magelda Montoya, Darrell M. Johnson, Kenneth B. BeckmanMichael P. Busch, Josefina Coloma, Joseph A. Lewnard, Eva Harris, Lisa F. Barcellos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Comprehensive data on transmission mitigation behaviors and both SARS-CoV-2 infection and serostatus are needed from large, community-based cohorts to identify COVID-19 risk factors and the impact of public health measures. We conducted a longitudinal, population-based study in the East Bay Area of Northern California. From July 2020-March 2021, approximately 5,500 adults were recruited and followed over three data collection rounds to investigate the association between geographic and demographic characteristics and transmission mitigation behavior with SARS-CoV-2 prevalence. We estimated the populated-adjusted prevalence of antibodies from SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccination, and self-reported COVID-19 test positivity. Population-adjusted SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence was low, increasing from 1.03% (95% CI: 0.50–1.96) in Round 1 (July-September 2020), to 1.37% (95% CI: 0.75–2.39) in Round 2 (October-December 2020), to 2.18% (95% CI: 1.48–3.17) in Round 3 (February-March 2021). Population-adjusted seroprevalence of COVID-19 vaccination was 21.64% (95% CI: 19.20–24.34) in Round 3, with White individuals having 4.35% (95% CI: 0.35–8.32) higher COVID-19 vaccine seroprevalence than individuals identifying as African American or Black, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian, Hispanic, two or more races, or other. No evidence for an association between transmission mitigation behavior and seroprevalence was observed. Despite >99% of participants reporting wearing masks individuals identifying as African American or Black, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian, Hispanic, two or more races, or other, as well as those in lower-income households, and lower-educated individuals had the highest SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence and lowest vaccination seroprevalence. Results demonstrate that more effective policies are needed to address these disparities and inequities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0000647
JournalPLOS global public health
Volume2
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Adams et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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