Health care providers’ support of patients’ autonomy, phosphate medication adherence, race and gender in end stage renal disease

Ebele M. Umeukeje, Joseph R. Merighi, Teri Browne, Marcus Wild, Hafez Alsmaan, Kausik Umanath, Julia B. Lewis, Kenneth A. Wallston, Kerri L. Cavanaugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study was designed to assess dialysis subjects’ perceived autonomy support association with phosphate binder medication adherence, race and gender. A multi-site cross-sectional study was conducted among 377 dialysis subjects. The Health Care Climate (HCC) Questionnaire assessed subjects’ perception of their providers’ autonomy support for phosphate binder use, and adherence was assessed by the self-reported Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Serum phosphorus was obtained from the medical record. Regression models were used to examine independent factors of medication adherence, serum phosphorus, and differences by race and gender. Non-white HCC scores were consistently lower compared with white subjects’ scores. No differences were observed by gender. Reported phosphate binder adherence was associated with HCC score, and also with phosphorus control. No significant association was found between HCC score and serum phosphorus. Autonomy support, especially in non-white end stage renal disease subjects, may be an appropriate target for culturally informed strategies to optimize mineral bone health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1104-1114
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Autonomy support
  • Bone mineral disorder
  • Dialysis
  • Gender
  • Medication adherence
  • Race
  • Self-determination theory

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