Health Care Coverage and Access Among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults, 2010–2016: Implications for Future Health Reforms

Donna L. Spencer, Margaret McManus, Kathleen T Call, Joanna M Turner, Christopher Harwood, Patience White, Giovann Alarcon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We examine changes to health insurance coverage and access to health care among children, adolescents, and young adults since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Methods: Using the National Health Interview Survey, bivariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare coverage and access among children, young adolescents, older adolescents, and young adults between 2010 and 2016. Results: We show significant improvements in coverage among children, adolescents, and young adults since 2010. We also find some gains in access during this time, particularly reductions in delayed care due to cost. While we observe few age-group differences in overall trends in coverage and access, our analysis reveals an age-gradient pattern, with incrementally worse coverage and access rates for young adolescents, older adolescents, and young adults. Conclusions: Prior analyses often group adolescents with younger children, masking important distinctions. Future reforms should consider the increased coverage and access risks of adolescents and young adults, recognizing that approximately 40% are low income, over a third live in the South, where many states have not expanded Medicaid, and over 15% have compromised health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-673
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Young Adult
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Health Services Accessibility
Insurance Coverage
Medicaid
Health Insurance
Health Surveys
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Health insurance
  • Health services accessibility
  • Young adult

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Health Care Coverage and Access Among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults, 2010–2016 : Implications for Future Health Reforms. / Spencer, Donna L.; McManus, Margaret; Call, Kathleen T; Turner, Joanna M; Harwood, Christopher; White, Patience; Alarcon, Giovann.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 62, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 667-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spencer, Donna L. ; McManus, Margaret ; Call, Kathleen T ; Turner, Joanna M ; Harwood, Christopher ; White, Patience ; Alarcon, Giovann. / Health Care Coverage and Access Among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults, 2010–2016 : Implications for Future Health Reforms. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2018 ; Vol. 62, No. 6. pp. 667-673.
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