Hazardous noise exposure from noisy toys may increase after purchase and removal from packaging: A call for advocacy

Noel Jabbour, Heather M. Weinreich, James Owusu, Marta Lehn, Bevan Yueh, Samuel C Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Previous studies identified hazardous noise levels from packaged toys. Sound levels may increase when packaging is removed and therefore, complicate the ability to accurately assess noise levels before purchase. The goal of this study was to evaluate how packaging affects the decibel (dB) level of toys by: 1) Assessing dB level of toys with and without packaging. 2) Evaluating the percentage of packaged and unpackaged toys that exceed a safety limit of 85 dB. Methods: Thirty-five toys were selected from the 2009–2011 Sight and Hearing Association (SHA) based on availability for purchase. Toys’ speakers were categorized as Exposed, Partially Exposed, or Covered, based on its packaging. The dB level of each toy was tested at 0 cm and 25 cm from the speaker using a handheld digital sound meter in a standard audiometric booth. T tests and ANOVA were performed to assess mean change in sound level before and after packaging removal. Results: Significant dB increases were noted after packaging was removed (mean change 11.9 dB at 0 cm; and 2.5 dB at 25 cm, p < 0.001). Sixty-four percentage of Covered toys (n = 14) had dB greater than 85 dB when packaged and this increased to 100% when unpackaged. Conclusion: Many manufactured toys have hazardous sound levels. Caregivers and healthcare providers should be aware that toys tested in the store may actually be louder when brought home and removed from their packaging. Limits on and disclosure of dB level of toys should be considered nationally.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages84-87
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume116
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Play and Playthings
Product Packaging
Noise
Aptitude
Disclosure
Health Personnel
Caregivers
Hearing
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Hearing loss
  • Noise
  • Pediatric
  • Toys

Cite this

Hazardous noise exposure from noisy toys may increase after purchase and removal from packaging : A call for advocacy. / Jabbour, Noel; Weinreich, Heather M.; Owusu, James; Lehn, Marta; Yueh, Bevan; Levine, Samuel C.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 116, 01.01.2019, p. 84-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9e099a2abcfe4bbc9aaa4695fd17f44b,
title = "Hazardous noise exposure from noisy toys may increase after purchase and removal from packaging: A call for advocacy",
abstract = "Objective: Previous studies identified hazardous noise levels from packaged toys. Sound levels may increase when packaging is removed and therefore, complicate the ability to accurately assess noise levels before purchase. The goal of this study was to evaluate how packaging affects the decibel (dB) level of toys by: 1) Assessing dB level of toys with and without packaging. 2) Evaluating the percentage of packaged and unpackaged toys that exceed a safety limit of 85 dB. Methods: Thirty-five toys were selected from the 2009–2011 Sight and Hearing Association (SHA) based on availability for purchase. Toys’ speakers were categorized as Exposed, Partially Exposed, or Covered, based on its packaging. The dB level of each toy was tested at 0 cm and 25 cm from the speaker using a handheld digital sound meter in a standard audiometric booth. T tests and ANOVA were performed to assess mean change in sound level before and after packaging removal. Results: Significant dB increases were noted after packaging was removed (mean change 11.9 dB at 0 cm; and 2.5 dB at 25 cm, p < 0.001). Sixty-four percentage of Covered toys (n = 14) had dB greater than 85 dB when packaged and this increased to 100{\%} when unpackaged. Conclusion: Many manufactured toys have hazardous sound levels. Caregivers and healthcare providers should be aware that toys tested in the store may actually be louder when brought home and removed from their packaging. Limits on and disclosure of dB level of toys should be considered nationally.",
keywords = "Hearing loss, Noise, Pediatric, Toys",
author = "Noel Jabbour and Weinreich, {Heather M.} and James Owusu and Marta Lehn and Bevan Yueh and Levine, {Samuel C}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.10.028",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "116",
pages = "84--87",
journal = "International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology",
issn = "0165-5876",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hazardous noise exposure from noisy toys may increase after purchase and removal from packaging

T2 - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

AU - Jabbour, Noel

AU - Weinreich, Heather M.

AU - Owusu, James

AU - Lehn, Marta

AU - Yueh, Bevan

AU - Levine, Samuel C

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: Previous studies identified hazardous noise levels from packaged toys. Sound levels may increase when packaging is removed and therefore, complicate the ability to accurately assess noise levels before purchase. The goal of this study was to evaluate how packaging affects the decibel (dB) level of toys by: 1) Assessing dB level of toys with and without packaging. 2) Evaluating the percentage of packaged and unpackaged toys that exceed a safety limit of 85 dB. Methods: Thirty-five toys were selected from the 2009–2011 Sight and Hearing Association (SHA) based on availability for purchase. Toys’ speakers were categorized as Exposed, Partially Exposed, or Covered, based on its packaging. The dB level of each toy was tested at 0 cm and 25 cm from the speaker using a handheld digital sound meter in a standard audiometric booth. T tests and ANOVA were performed to assess mean change in sound level before and after packaging removal. Results: Significant dB increases were noted after packaging was removed (mean change 11.9 dB at 0 cm; and 2.5 dB at 25 cm, p < 0.001). Sixty-four percentage of Covered toys (n = 14) had dB greater than 85 dB when packaged and this increased to 100% when unpackaged. Conclusion: Many manufactured toys have hazardous sound levels. Caregivers and healthcare providers should be aware that toys tested in the store may actually be louder when brought home and removed from their packaging. Limits on and disclosure of dB level of toys should be considered nationally.

AB - Objective: Previous studies identified hazardous noise levels from packaged toys. Sound levels may increase when packaging is removed and therefore, complicate the ability to accurately assess noise levels before purchase. The goal of this study was to evaluate how packaging affects the decibel (dB) level of toys by: 1) Assessing dB level of toys with and without packaging. 2) Evaluating the percentage of packaged and unpackaged toys that exceed a safety limit of 85 dB. Methods: Thirty-five toys were selected from the 2009–2011 Sight and Hearing Association (SHA) based on availability for purchase. Toys’ speakers were categorized as Exposed, Partially Exposed, or Covered, based on its packaging. The dB level of each toy was tested at 0 cm and 25 cm from the speaker using a handheld digital sound meter in a standard audiometric booth. T tests and ANOVA were performed to assess mean change in sound level before and after packaging removal. Results: Significant dB increases were noted after packaging was removed (mean change 11.9 dB at 0 cm; and 2.5 dB at 25 cm, p < 0.001). Sixty-four percentage of Covered toys (n = 14) had dB greater than 85 dB when packaged and this increased to 100% when unpackaged. Conclusion: Many manufactured toys have hazardous sound levels. Caregivers and healthcare providers should be aware that toys tested in the store may actually be louder when brought home and removed from their packaging. Limits on and disclosure of dB level of toys should be considered nationally.

KW - Hearing loss

KW - Noise

KW - Pediatric

KW - Toys

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055339763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85055339763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.10.028

DO - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.10.028

M3 - Article

VL - 116

SP - 84

EP - 87

JO - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

JF - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

SN - 0165-5876

ER -