Guinea pig cytomegalovirus: A model for the prevention and treatment of maternal-fetal cytomegalovirus transmission

Mark R. Schleiss, Michael A. McVoy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

A major public health challenge today is the problem of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) transmission. Maternal-fetal CMV infections are common, occurring in up to 2% of all pregnancies, and these infections often lead to long-term injury of the newborn infant. In spite of the well-recognized burden that these infections place on society, there are, as yet, no clearly established interventions available to prevent transmission of CMV. In order to study potential interventions, such as vaccines, antivirals or immunotherapies, an animal model of congenital CMV transmission is required. The best small animal model of CMV transmission is the guinea pig/guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) model. This article places the guinea pig/GPCMV model into a larger context, emphasizing how studies in this system have relevance to human health. Emphasis is placed on how the vertical transmission of GPCMV recapitulates the pathogenesis of congenital CMV in infants, making this a uniquely well-suited model for the study of CMV vaccines and therapeutics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-217
Number of pages11
JournalFuture Virology
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Antiviral therapy
  • Congenital cytomegalovirus infection
  • Cytomegalovirus immune globulin
  • Cytomegalovirus vaccines
  • Glycoprotein B vaccine
  • Guinea pig cytomegalovirus
  • Live attenuated vaccine
  • Neutralizing antibodies
  • Pp65 vaccine

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