Growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Zea mays seedlings deficient in abscisic acid and gibberellic acid

Randy Moore, Kevin Dickey

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Moore, R. and Dickey, K. 1985. Growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Zea mays seedlings deficient in abscisic acid and gibberellic acid.-J. exp. Bot. 36: 1793-1798.The objective of this research was to determine if gibberellic acid (GA) and/or abscisic acid (ABA) are necessary for graviresponsiveness by primary roots of Zea mays. To accomplish this objective we measured the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of seedlings in which the synthesis of ABA and GA was inhibited collectively and individually by genetic and chemical means. Roots of seedlings treated with Fluridone (an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) and Ancymidol (an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) were characterized by slower growth rates but not significantly different gravicurvatures as compared to untreated controls. Gravicurvatures of primary roots of d-5 mutants (having undetectable levels of GA) and vp-9 mutants (having undetectable levels of ABA) were not significantly different from those of wild-type seedlings. Roots of seedlings in which the biosynthesis of ABA and GA was collectively inhibited were characterized by gravicurvatures not significantly different from those of controls. These results (1) indicate that drastic reductions in the amount of ABA and GA in Z. mays seedlings do not significantly alter root graviresponsiveness, (2) suggest that neither ABA nor GA is necessary for root gravicurvature, and (3) indicate that root gravicurvature is not necessarily proportional to root elongation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1793-1798
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of experimental botany
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1985

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank Dr Jim Barrentine for kindly providing Fluridone, and Elanco Products for kindly providing Ancymidol. This research was supported by Grant No. NAGW-734 from the Space Biology Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Keywords

  • Abscisic acid
  • Ancymidol
  • Fluridone
  • Gibberellic acid
  • Root gravitropism
  • Zea mays

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