Group identification and college adjustment: The experience of encountering a novel stereotype

Matthew Newman, Kelli Keough, Rich Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous research has investigated members of stigmatized groups by studying the consequences of encountering stereotypes for performance and self-esteem. The present study extends these findings by examining the experience of entering a new environment and encountering a negative stereotype for the first time (i.e., a novel stereotype). Participants were students admitted "provisionally" to a large state university. Results suggest that, when encountering a novel stereotype, targets of stereotypes differed in their identification with the group, and that this identification moderated the consequences of the stereotype for performance and self-esteem. Implications for future research are discussed. These data also suggest that a college-based intervention program can provide a buffer against negative stereotypes by reducing the perceived applicability of the stereotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)694-708
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Social Psychology
Volume149
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

Keywords

  • Academic performance
  • Education
  • Group identification
  • Self-esteem
  • Stereotype

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