GOSA, a simulated annealing-based program for global optimization of nonlinear problems, also reveals transyears

Jerzy Czaplicki, Germaine G Cornelissen-Guillaume, Franz Halberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transyears in biology have been documented thus far by the extended cosinor approach, including linear-nonlinear rhythmometry. We here confirm the existence of transyears by simulated annealing, a method originally developed for a much broader use, but described and introduced herein for validating its application to time series. The method is illustrated both on an artificial test case with known components and on biological data. We provide a table comparing results by the two methods and trust that the procedure will serve the budding sciences of chronobiology (the study of mechanisms underlying biological time structure), chronomics (the mapping of time structures in and around us), and chronobioethics, using the foregoing disciplines to add to concern for illnesses of individuals also a budding focus on diseases of societies, like crime, and of nations and civilizations, like war.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-94
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Biomedicine
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

Keywords

  • Cosinor
  • Linear-nonlinear rhythmometry
  • Simulated annealing
  • Transyears

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