Global positioning system data-loggers

A tool to quantify fine-scale movement of Domestic animals to evaluate potential for zoonotic transmission to an endangered wildlife population

Michele B. Parsons, Thomas R. Gillespie, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Dominic Travis, Iddi Lipende, Baraka Gilagiza, Shadrack Kamenya, Lilian Pintea, Gonzalo M. Vazquez-Prokopec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Domesticated animals are an important source of pathogens to endangered wildlife populations, especially when anthropogenic activities increase their overlap with humans and wildlife. Recent work in Tanzania reports the introduction of Cryptosporidium into wild chimpanzee populations and the increased risk of ape mortality associated with SIVcpz-Cryptosporidium co-infection. Here we describe the application of novel GPS technology to track the mobility of domesticated animals (27 goats, 2 sheep and 8 dogs) with the goal of identifying potential routes for Cryptosporidium introduction into Gombe National Park. Only goats (5/27) and sheep (2/2) were positive for Cryptosporidium. Analysis of GPS tracks indicated that a crop field frequented by both chimpanzees and domesticated animals was a potential hotspot for Cryptosporidium transmission. This study demonstrates the applicability of GPS data-loggers in studies of fine-scale mobility of animals and suggests that domesticated animal-wildlife overlap should be considered beyond protected boundaries for long-term conservation strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberA108
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 3 2014

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Geographic Information Systems
Cryptosporidium
global positioning systems
Domestic Animals
Zoonoses
domestic animals
Global positioning system
wildlife
Animals
Pan troglodytes
Population
animals
Goats
Sheep
goats
sheep
Tanzania
Hominidae
Pathogens
Pongidae

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Global positioning system data-loggers : A tool to quantify fine-scale movement of Domestic animals to evaluate potential for zoonotic transmission to an endangered wildlife population. / Parsons, Michele B.; Gillespie, Thomas R.; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Travis, Dominic; Lipende, Iddi; Gilagiza, Baraka; Kamenya, Shadrack; Pintea, Lilian; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 11, A108, 03.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parsons, Michele B. ; Gillespie, Thomas R. ; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V. ; Travis, Dominic ; Lipende, Iddi ; Gilagiza, Baraka ; Kamenya, Shadrack ; Pintea, Lilian ; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M. / Global positioning system data-loggers : A tool to quantify fine-scale movement of Domestic animals to evaluate potential for zoonotic transmission to an endangered wildlife population. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 11.
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