Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health

David Tilman, Michael Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

655 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diets link environmental and human health. Rising incomes and urbanization are driving a global dietary transition in which traditional diets are replaced by diets higher in refined sugars, refined fats, oils and meats. By 2050 these dietary trends, if unchecked, would be a major contributor to an estimated 80 per cent increase in global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from food production and to global land clearing. Moreover, these dietary shifts are greatly increasing the incidence of type II diabetes, coronary heart disease and other chronic non-communicable diseases that lower global life expectancies. Alternative diets that offer substantial health benefits could, if widely adopted, reduce global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, reduce land clearing and resultant species extinctions, and help prevent such diet-related chronic non-communicable diseases. The implementation of dietary solutions to the tightly linked diet-environment-health trilemma is a global challenge, and opportunity, of great environmental and public health importance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)518-522
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume515
Issue number7528
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 27 2014

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Diet
Health
Environmental Health
Gases
Biological Extinction
Urbanization
Insurance Benefits
Life Expectancy
Meat
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Coronary Disease
Oils
Public Health
Fats
Food
Incidence

Cite this

Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health. / Tilman, David; Clark, Michael.

In: Nature, Vol. 515, No. 7528, 27.11.2014, p. 518-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tilman, David ; Clark, Michael. / Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health. In: Nature. 2014 ; Vol. 515, No. 7528. pp. 518-522.
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