Genetic counseling supervisor strategies

An elaboration of the Reciprocal-Engagement Model of Supervision

Mike Darren Suguitan, Patricia M Veach, Bonnie S LeRoy, Colleen Wherley, Krista A Redlinger-Grosse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Clinical supervision plays a key role in the training of genetic counselor practitioners. The Reciprocal-Engagement Model of Supervision (REM-S) is a recently published model of genetic counseling supervision centered on the supervisor–student relationship. The REM-S comprises five tenets and 16 goals that reciprocally interact to achieve three broad supervision outcomes. Lacking, however, is a comprehensive set of supervisor strategies that correspond to the tenets and goals. This study aimed to elaborate the REM-S by identifying strategies genetic counselor supervisors use to accomplish each REM-S goal when they supervise students in clinical rotations. Nineteen prenatal, pediatric, and cancer genetic counselor supervisors from clinics in a major Midwestern city participated in one of three focus groups. Eleven semistructured questions were asked about strategies they use when attempting to accomplish each REM-S goal. Directed content analysis yielded a total of 14 different strategy domains that vary in their frequency for accomplishing each REM-S goal. Participants identified between nine and 13 strategy domains for each goal. Across all REM-S goals, the most frequent strategy domains are: Assess student; Practice self-reflection to increase supervisor self-awareness; and Establish student goals and expectations. The present findings elaborate the REM-S by identifying supervisor strategies corresponding to the REM-S goals. These strategies can inform training in clinical supervision, and they can be the focus of observational studies designed to identify supervisor behaviors that characterize each strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)602-615
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Genetic Counseling
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

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Genetic Counseling
Students
Focus Groups
Observational Studies

Keywords

  • Reciprocal-Engagement Model of Supervision
  • genetic counseling clinical supervision
  • genetic counseling supervision goals
  • genetic counseling supervision models
  • genetic counseling supervision strategies

Cite this

Genetic counseling supervisor strategies : An elaboration of the Reciprocal-Engagement Model of Supervision. / Suguitan, Mike Darren; Veach, Patricia M; LeRoy, Bonnie S; Wherley, Colleen; Redlinger-Grosse, Krista A.

In: Journal of Genetic Counseling, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.06.2019, p. 602-615.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suguitan, Mike Darren ; Veach, Patricia M ; LeRoy, Bonnie S ; Wherley, Colleen ; Redlinger-Grosse, Krista A. / Genetic counseling supervisor strategies : An elaboration of the Reciprocal-Engagement Model of Supervision. In: Journal of Genetic Counseling. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 602-615.
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