Genetic analysis of integrin activation in T lymphocytes

Sirid Aimée Kellermann, Cheryl L. Dell, Stephen W. Hunt, Yoji Shimizu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among the myriad receptors expressed by T cells, the sine qua non is the CD3/T cell receptor (CD3/TCR) complex, because it is uniquely capable of translating the presence of a specific antigen into intracellular signals necessary to trigger an immune response against a pathogen or tumor. Much work over the past 2 decades has attempted to define the signaling pathways leading from the CD3/TCR complex that culminate ultimately in the functions necessary for effective T cell immune responses, such as cytokine production. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which the CD3/TCR complex controls integrin-mediated T cell adhesion, and discuss new information that suggests that there may be unexpected facets to this pathway that distinguish it from those previously defined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-188
Number of pages17
JournalImmunological Reviews
Volume186
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2002

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Activation Analysis
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Integrins
T-Lymphocytes
Cell Adhesion
Cytokines
Antigens
Neoplasms

Cite this

Genetic analysis of integrin activation in T lymphocytes. / Kellermann, Sirid Aimée; Dell, Cheryl L.; Hunt, Stephen W.; Shimizu, Yoji.

In: Immunological Reviews, Vol. 186, 01.08.2002, p. 172-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kellermann, Sirid Aimée ; Dell, Cheryl L. ; Hunt, Stephen W. ; Shimizu, Yoji. / Genetic analysis of integrin activation in T lymphocytes. In: Immunological Reviews. 2002 ; Vol. 186. pp. 172-188.
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