Gendered racial vulnerability: How women confront crime and criminalization

Amber Joy Powell, Michelle S. Phelps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prior research illustrates how race-class subjugated communities are over-policed and under-protected, producing high rates of victimization by other community members and the police. Yet few studies explore how gender and race structure dual frustration, despite a long line of Black feminist scholarship on the interpersonal, gender-based, and state violence Black and other women of color face. Drawing on interviews with 53 women in Minneapolis from 2017 to 2019, we examine how gendered racial vulnerability to both crime and criminalization shape dual frustration toward the law. Findings illustrate that police fail to protect women of color from neighborhood and gender-based violence, while simultaneously targeting them and their families. Despite their spatial proximity to women of color, white women remained largely shielded from the dual frustration of crime and criminalization. Attention to the gendered racial dimensions of dual frustration offers an intersectional framework for understanding women's vulnerability to violence and cultural orientations toward the law.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-451
Number of pages23
JournalLaw and Society Review
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 30 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Center for Urban and Regional Affairs, University of Minnesota; Ronald E. McNair Scholarship Program; University of Minnesota's Grant‐in‐Aid of Research, Artistry, and Scholarship program; University of Minnesota Beverly and Richard Fink Summer Fellowship; University of Minnesota Sociology Department; American Bar Foundation and National Science Foundation, Grant/Award Number: SES‐1946670 Funding information

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Christopher Robertson, Isabel Arriagada, Caity Curry, Victoria Piehowski, Christopher Uggen, De Andre' Beadle, Rachel Schurman, Andrea Boyles, Sarah Shannon, and Heather Hlavka for providing constructive suggestions. We also thank our team of interviewers (Santino Reynolds, AshLee Smith, and De Andre' Beadle), transcriptionists (Paige Olson and Maya Smith), and editor (Emma Frankham). Support for the project was provided by the University of Minnesota's Grant‐in‐Aid of Research, Artistry, and Scholarship program; Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (Faculty Interactive Research Program); University of Minnesota Beverly and Richard Fink Summer Fellowship Program; Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program at the University of Minnesota; the University of Minnesota's Sociology Department; the Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach‐Engagement Center; and the American Bar Foundation and National Science Foundation under Grant No. SES‐1946670. Most importantly, we thank project participants for sharing their experiences, fears, and hopes with us.

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Christopher Robertson, Isabel Arriagada, Caity Curry, Victoria Piehowski, Christopher Uggen, De Andre' Beadle, Rachel Schurman, Andrea Boyles, Sarah Shannon, and Heather Hlavka for providing constructive suggestions. We also thank our team of interviewers (Santino Reynolds, AshLee Smith, and De Andre' Beadle), transcriptionists (Paige Olson and Maya Smith), and editor (Emma Frankham). Support for the project was provided by the University of Minnesota's Grant-in-Aid of Research, Artistry, and Scholarship program; Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (Faculty Interactive Research Program); University of Minnesota Beverly and Richard Fink Summer Fellowship Program; Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program at the University of Minnesota; the University of Minnesota's Sociology Department; the Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center; and the American Bar Foundation and National Science Foundation under Grant No. SES-1946670. Most importantly, we thank project participants for sharing their experiences, fears, and hopes with us.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Law and Society Association.

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