Gender Makes a Difference: Investigating Consumer Purchasing Behavior and Attitudes Toward Corporate Social Responsibility Policies

Raymond J. Jones, Timothy M. Reilly, Marcus Z. Cox, Brooklyn M. Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

The balance between profit maximization and corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a strategic issue of considerable importance. A key factor in understanding this relationship is identifying consumer reactions to engaging in CSR. Prior literature suggests a gap between consumers' environmental attitudes and behaviors. This study examines this relationship and finds evidence that gender significantly influences this gap between attitudes and behaviors. Specifically, we find that for female segments of the consumer population, this gap is greatly reduced. We use social identity theory to explain this phenomenon of gender differences as they relate to CSR. Along with providing insight to CSR at the individual level with attitudes and behaviors, our findings also have implications at the firm- level for how organizations choose and strategically signal their CSR strategies toward specific consumer segments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-144
Number of pages12
JournalCorporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Keywords

  • consumer attitudes and behavior
  • corporate social responsibility
  • firm strategy
  • gender

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