Gender differences in long-term survival post-transplant: A single-institution analysis in the lung allocation score era

Gabriel Loor, Roland Brown, Rosemary F Kelly, Kyle Rudser, Sara J Shumway, Irena Cich, Christopher T. Holley, Colleen Quinlan, Marshall I Hertz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to clarify the significance of recipient gender status on lung transplant outcomes in a large single-institution experience spanning three decades, we analyzed data from all lung transplants performed in our institution since 1986. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the effect of recipient characteristics on survival and BOS score ≥1-free survival. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the association of gender with short-term graft function. About 876 lung transplants were performed between 1986 and 2016. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates at 5 years post-transplant for females vs males in the LAS era were 71% vs 58%. In the LAS era, females showed greater unadjusted BOS≥1-free survival than males (35% vs 25%, P=.02) over 5 years. Female gender was the only factor in the LAS era significantly associated with improved adjusted 5-year survival [HR 0.56 (95% CI 0.33, 0.95) P=.03]. Conversely, in the pre-LAS era female gender was not associated with improved survival. Female recipients showed significantly improved survival over 5 years compared to males in the LAS era. A prospective analysis of biologic and immunologic differences is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12889
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Transplants
Lung
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Proportional Hazards Models
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome
  • clinical outcomes
  • gender
  • lung transplant
  • primary graft dysfunction
  • recipient factors

Cite this

Gender differences in long-term survival post-transplant : A single-institution analysis in the lung allocation score era. / Loor, Gabriel; Brown, Roland; Kelly, Rosemary F; Rudser, Kyle; Shumway, Sara J; Cich, Irena; Holley, Christopher T.; Quinlan, Colleen; Hertz, Marshall I.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 31, No. 3, e12889, 01.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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