Gender Attitudes, Gendered Partisanship: Feminism and Support for Sarah Palin and Hillary Clinton among Party Activists

Elizabeth A. Sharrow, Dara Z. Strolovitch, Michael T. Heaney, Seth E. Masket, Joanne M. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Activists in the Democratic and Republican parties have distinct concerns about women’s place in American politics and society. These views lead them to evaluate female candidates through different ideological lenses that are conditioned, in part, on their divergent attitudes about gender. We explore the implications of these diverging lenses through an examination of the 2008 candidacies of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, using data from an original survey of Democratic and Republican National Convention delegates. We find that delegate sex did not affect their evaluations but that evaluations were influenced by the interaction of partisanship and attitudes about women’s roles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-416
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Women, Politics and Policy
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors acknowledge financial support from the National Science Foundation, Small Grants for Exploratory Research #0842474 and #0842371 and from the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs at the University of Minnesota.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Taylor & Francis.

Copyright:
Copyright 2016 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • 2008 election
  • Hillary Clinton
  • Sarah Palin
  • feminism
  • gender
  • nominating conventions
  • partisan polarization
  • party delegates
  • presidential nominations
  • women

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