Gastrostomy tube placement by endoscopy versus radiologic methods in patients with ALS: A retrospective study of complications and outcome

Jeffrey A. Allen, Richard Chen, Senda Ajroud-Driss, Robert L. Sufit, Scott Heller, Teepu Siddique, Lisa Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gastrostomy tube placement for malnutrition and weight loss stabilization occurs in many patients with ALS. We sought to compare the outcome and complications of gastrostomy tube placement by endoscopic (PEG) and multiple radiologic (RIG) methods in ALS patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted on all ALS patients evaluated at Northwestern University who received gastrostomy tubes between January 2009 and March 2012. One hundred and eight gastrostomy tube attempts were made on a total of 100 different patients. Failed gastrostomy tube placement occurred in 15.7% of PEGs and 1.9% of RIGs. Post-procedure aspiration was recognized after 10.5% PEG and 0 RIG attempts. Multivariate analysis revealed a linear increase in risk of post-procedure aspiration for every increase in ALSFRS swallow score. No statistically significant differences in failure or complications were observed when comparing two different methods of RIG (push-type vs. pull-type). Our findings support gastrostomy tube placement by radiographic methods in ALS patients. Gastrostomy tube placement by RIG was more often successful and less often associated with aspiration. Our findings add to the growing body of literature that argues for early gastrostomy tube placement in young patients with prominent bulbar involvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)308-314
Number of pages7
JournalAmyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

Keywords

  • ALS
  • Nutrition
  • Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy
  • Pull-type
  • Push-type
  • Radiologically inserted G-tube

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gastrostomy tube placement by endoscopy versus radiologic methods in patients with ALS: A retrospective study of complications and outcome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this