Gas entrainment behaviors in the formation and collapse of a ventilated supercavity

Ashish Karn, Roger E A Arndt, Jiarong Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present work reports some interesting gas entrainment behaviors in the formation and collapse of a ventilated supercavity under steady and unsteady flow conditions. Our experiments show that the gas entrainment required to establish a supercavity are much greater than the minimum gas entrainment required to sustain it, and these gas entrainment values depend on Froude (Fr) number, cavitator size and the flow unsteadiness. Specifically, the measurements of the formation gas entrainment coefficients under different Fr numbers indicate that it does not monotonically increase with Fr but displays increasing and decreasing trends in different regimes of Fr. On the other hand, the collapse air entrainment coefficient initially decreases with Fr and then approaches to a constant. Similar trends of formation and collapse gas entrainment coefficient are observed for different cavitator sizes. Moreover, the introduction of unsteady gusts causes a slight monotonic increase in the formation and collapse gas entrainment requirements. Our study points out the crucial factors to be considered in the estimation of gas storage requirements for a ventilated supercavitating vehicle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-300
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Thermal and Fluid Science
Volume79
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors acknowledge support by the Office of Naval Research – United States (Program manager, Dr. Ronald Joslin) under Grant # N000140910141 . We also acknowledge the help of an undergraduate student, Mr. Roger Borgeson in carrying out the experiments.

Keywords

  • Supercavitation
  • Supercavity collapse
  • Supercavity formation
  • Ventilation
  • Ventilation hysteresis

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