Fungal necromass presents a high potential for Mercury immobilization in soil

Francois L Maillard, Stéphane Pflender, Katherine A. Heckman, Michel Chalot, Peter G. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Past industrial activities have generated many contaminated lands from which Mercury (Hg) escapes, primarily by volatilization. Current phytomanagement techniques aim to limit Hg dispersion by increasing its stabilization in soil. Although soil fungi represent a source of Hg emission associated with biovolatilization mechanisms, there is limited knowledge about how dead fungal residues (i.e., fungal necromass) interact with soil Hg. This study determined the Hg biosorption potential of fungal necromass and the chemical drivers of passive Hg binding with dead mycelia. Fungal necromass was incubated under field conditions with contrasting chemical properties at a well-characterized Hg phytomanagement experimental site in France. After four months of incubation in soil, fungal residues passively accumulated substantial quantities of Hg in their recalcitrant fractions ranging from 400 to 4500 μg Hg/kg. In addition, infrared spectroscopy revealed that lipid compounds explained the amount of Hg biosorption to fungal necromass. Based on these findings, we propose that fungal necromass is likely an important factor in Hg immobilization in soil.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number136994
JournalChemosphere
Volume311
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank the two reviewers for their helpful comments on our manuscript. The authors also thank the U.S. National Science Foundation (# DEB 2038293 ) and the French ANR (# 2010-INTB- 1703-03 BIOFILTREE) for financial support. Finally, we also thank the Genomic Science Program (U.S. Department of Energy) Plant Microbe Interfaces (PMI) Scientific Focus Area ( http://pmi.ornl.gov/ ) for providing the Meliniomyces strain used in this study.

Funding Information:
We thank the two reviewers for their helpful comments on our manuscript. The authors also thank the U.S. National Science Foundation (#DEB 2038293) and the French ANR (#2010-INTB- 1703-03 BIOFILTREE) for financial support. Finally, we also thank the Genomic Science Program (U.S. Department of Energy) Plant Microbe Interfaces (PMI) Scientific Focus Area (http://pmi.ornl.gov/) for providing the Meliniomyces strain used in this study.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Fungal necromass
  • Hg biosorption
  • Hg cycle
  • Phytostabilization

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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