Fumaric acid: An overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

David W. Chia, Tennessee J. Yoder, Wolf Dieter Reiter, Susan I. Gibson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C3 plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C3 plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., contain significant quantities of fumaric acid. In fact, fumaric acid can accumulate to levels of several milligrams per gram fresh weight in Arabidopsis leaves, often exceeding those of starch and soluble sugars. Fumaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Moreover, Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-751
Number of pages9
JournalPlanta
Volume211
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

fumaric acid
Arabidopsis
Carbon
carbon
Starch
C3 plants
starch
sugars
skeleton
Soybeans
Skeleton
tricarboxylic acid cycle
Phloem
energy
plant age
plant organs
Citric Acid Cycle
phloem
Exudates and Transudates
light intensity

Keywords

  • Arabidopsis (fumaric acid)
  • Fumaric acid
  • Organic acid
  • Phloem
  • Starch
  • Sugar

Cite this

Fumaric acid : An overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species. / Chia, David W.; Yoder, Tennessee J.; Reiter, Wolf Dieter; Gibson, Susan I.

In: Planta, Vol. 211, No. 5, 01.01.2000, p. 743-751.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chia, David W. ; Yoder, Tennessee J. ; Reiter, Wolf Dieter ; Gibson, Susan I. / Fumaric acid : An overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species. In: Planta. 2000 ; Vol. 211, No. 5. pp. 743-751.
@article{abf39d7fc13c4a3cba8278be79e8fbc6,
title = "Fumaric acid: An overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species",
abstract = "Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C3 plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C3 plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., contain significant quantities of fumaric acid. In fact, fumaric acid can accumulate to levels of several milligrams per gram fresh weight in Arabidopsis leaves, often exceeding those of starch and soluble sugars. Fumaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Moreover, Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.",
keywords = "Arabidopsis (fumaric acid), Fumaric acid, Organic acid, Phloem, Starch, Sugar",
author = "Chia, {David W.} and Yoder, {Tennessee J.} and Reiter, {Wolf Dieter} and Gibson, {Susan I.}",
year = "2000",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s004250000345",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "211",
pages = "743--751",
journal = "Planta",
issn = "0032-0935",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fumaric acid

T2 - An overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

AU - Chia, David W.

AU - Yoder, Tennessee J.

AU - Reiter, Wolf Dieter

AU - Gibson, Susan I.

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C3 plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C3 plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., contain significant quantities of fumaric acid. In fact, fumaric acid can accumulate to levels of several milligrams per gram fresh weight in Arabidopsis leaves, often exceeding those of starch and soluble sugars. Fumaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Moreover, Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

AB - Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C3 plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C3 plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., contain significant quantities of fumaric acid. In fact, fumaric acid can accumulate to levels of several milligrams per gram fresh weight in Arabidopsis leaves, often exceeding those of starch and soluble sugars. Fumaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Moreover, Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

KW - Arabidopsis (fumaric acid)

KW - Fumaric acid

KW - Organic acid

KW - Phloem

KW - Starch

KW - Sugar

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033788076&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033788076&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s004250000345

DO - 10.1007/s004250000345

M3 - Article

C2 - 11089689

AN - SCOPUS:0033788076

VL - 211

SP - 743

EP - 751

JO - Planta

JF - Planta

SN - 0032-0935

IS - 5

ER -