Fruit and VegeTable Intake and Lung Cancer Incidence Among Black Women According to Cigarette Smoking Status

Sarah O Nomura, Chiranjeev Dash, Lynn Rosenberg, Julie Palmer, Lucile L. Adams-Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This project evaluated associations between fruit and vegetable intake, cigarette smoking and lung cancer incidence among U.S. Black women. The Black Women’s Health Study is a prospective cohort study (analytic cohort = 46,889) among Black women between the ages 21 and 69 at baseline (1995). Fruit and vegetable intake and smoking history were ascertained via questionnaires at baseline and during follow-up. Associations between fruit and vegetable intake, smoking and lung cancer incidence (N = 306 incident cases through 2013) were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Among women in this cohort, 6.1% and 5.6% reported consuming at least three servings/d of fruit or vegetables, respectively. Smoking history was associated with increased lung cancer incidence. Being a current smoker of ≥15 cigarettes/d was associated with higher lung cancer incidence compared to never smokers (HR = 17.4, 95% CI: 11.5, 26.4). Fruit and vegetable was not associated with lung cancer incidence intake (≥5 vs. <3 servings/d, adjusted HR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.54, 1.36). Associations between fruit and vegetable intake and lung cancer incidence did not differ by smoking history. Fruit and vegetable intake was low in this study population, but results do not support an association between fruit and vegetable intake and lung cancer incidence, regardless of smoking history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)904-912
Number of pages9
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Vegetables
Fruit
Lung Neoplasms
Smoking
Incidence
History
Women's Health
Tobacco Products
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Population

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Fruit and VegeTable Intake and Lung Cancer Incidence Among Black Women According to Cigarette Smoking Status. / Nomura, Sarah O; Dash, Chiranjeev; Rosenberg, Lynn; Palmer, Julie; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L.

In: Nutrition and Cancer, Vol. 70, No. 6, 18.08.2018, p. 904-912.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nomura, Sarah O ; Dash, Chiranjeev ; Rosenberg, Lynn ; Palmer, Julie ; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L. / Fruit and VegeTable Intake and Lung Cancer Incidence Among Black Women According to Cigarette Smoking Status. In: Nutrition and Cancer. 2018 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 904-912.
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