From Urban Renewal to the BeltLine: Atlanta’s Use of Public Health Narratives to Reshape the City

L. Katie OConnell, Nisha Botchwey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Since the early days of the planning profession, city agencies relied on a public health crisis narrative as a rationale for mass displacement efforts that targeted black communities. Over time, as cities gentrified with white, middle-class residents, the narrative shifted toward the city as a place of health. This article compares Atlanta’s redevelopment narratives from urban renewal to its current citywide greenway project, the BeltLine, to understand how city officials utilized public health language to rationalize displacement and how the narratives ran counter to residents’ lived experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-27
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Planning History
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Atlanta
  • BeltLine
  • community
  • disparities
  • health
  • inequities
  • infrastructure
  • narratives
  • planning eras/approaches
  • urban renewal

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