Frequency and characteristics associated with exposure to tobacco direct mail marketing and its prospective effect on smoking behaviors among young adults from the US Midwest

Kelvin Choi, Jean L. Forster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the exposure to tobacco direct mail marketing and its effect on subsequent smoking behaviors in a US Midwest regional cohort of young adults. Methods. Data were collected from 2622 young adults (mean age = 24 years) in 2010 to 2011 (baseline) and 2011 to 2012 (follow-up). We collected information on demographics, tobacco use, and exposure to tobacco direct mail materials in the previous 6 months at baseline. Smoking behaviors were reassessed at follow-up. We investigated the characteristics associated with receiving these materials at baseline, and the associations between receiving cigarette coupons in the mail at baseline and smoking behaviors at follow-up. Results. Thirteen percent of participants reported receiving tobacco direct mail materials in the previous 6 months. Receipt of these materials was associated with age, education, and tobacco use (P < .05). Among those who received these materials, 77% and 56% reported receiving coupons for cigarettes and other tobacco products, respectively. Among baseline non-smokers and ex-smokers, receiving coupons was associated with becoming current smokers at follow-up ( P < .05). Among baseline current smokers, receiving coupons was associated with lower likelihood of smoking cessation at follow-up ( P < .05). Conclusions. Tobacco direct mail marketing promoted and sustained smoking behaviors among US Midwest young adults. Regulating this marketing strategy might reduce the prevalence of smoking in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2179-2183
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume104
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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