Force of infection of Helicobacter pylori in Mexico: Evidence from a national survey using a hierarchical Bayesian model

F. Alarid-Escudero, E. A. Enns, R. F. MacLehose, J. Parsonnet, J. Torres, K. M. Kuntz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is present in the stomach of half of the world's population. The force of infection describes the rate at which susceptibles acquire infection. In this article, we estimated the age-specific force of infection of H. pylori in Mexico. Data came from a national H. pylori seroepidemiology survey collected in Mexico in 1987-88. We modelled the number of individuals with H. pylori at a given age as a binomial random variable. We assumed that the cumulative risk of infection by a given age follows a modified exponential catalytic model, allowing some fraction of the population to remain uninfected. The cumulative risk of infection was modelled for each state in Mexico and were shrunk towards the overall national cumulative risk curve using Bayesian hierarchical models. The proportion of the population that can be infected (i.e. susceptible population) is 85.9% (95% credible interval (CR) 84.3%-87.5%). The constant rate of infection per year of age among the susceptible population is 0.092 (95% CR 0.084-0.100). The estimated force of infection was highest at birth 0.079 (95% CR 0.071-0.087) decreasing to zero as age increases. This Bayesian hierarchical model allows stable estimation of state-specific force of infection by pooling information between the states, resulting in more realistic estimates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)961-969
Number of pages9
JournalEpidemiology and infection
Volume146
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Cambridge University Press.

Keywords

  • Bayesian hierarchical models
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Mexico
  • catalytic epidemic models
  • force of infection

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