Food for thought: Examining the relationship between food thought suppression and weight-related outcomes

Rachel D. Barnes, Stacey Tantleff-Dunn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study sought to extend previous eating behaviors and thought suppression literature by assessing the relationship between food thought suppression and weight-related outcomes. Three hundred and twelve overweight/obese community men and women completed self-report measures of thought suppression, weight history, and eating behaviors. Women were more likely than men to endorse food thought suppression, as were individuals who currently were dieting, when compared with those nondieters. Food thought suppression also predicted binge eating, food cravings, and other eating disordered symptoms. Results have implications for obesity and support further exploration of third wave interventions, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness, in the treatment of obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-179
Number of pages5
JournalEating Behaviors
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Binge eating
  • Eating disorder
  • Food cravings
  • Obesity
  • Thought suppression
  • Weight

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