Food and Death

Foodways and Communities in the Danza general de la muerte

Michelle M Hamilton, María Morris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

The late medieval text Danza general de la muerte, the Iberian version of the Dance of Death, in which Death personified meets, greets and reaps victims from all walks of life, is full of allusions to food and drink.1 In this anonymous late fourteenth-century or early fi eenth- century poetic dialogue, Death personified speaks with one victim a er another, and in their dialogues we find food and the rituals of its consumption playing an important role in defining the vari- ous characters and revealing why it is their moment to die. In this chapter, I examine how the unknown author of the Danza uses food (among several other elements, including clothing and language) to mark inclusion in or exclusion from particular social or community groups. Food is one element in the construction and representation of a whole spectrum of cultural attributes, including religious types (Jew, Christian), social status (rich, poor), and types of learned profession- als (the doctor, the abbot).
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationForging communities
Subtitle of host publicationFood and representation in medieval and early modern Southwestern Europe
EditorsMontserrat Piera
PublisherThe University of Arkansas Press
Pages35-54
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-61075-642-6
ISBN (Print)978-1-68226-068-5
StatePublished - 2018

Publication series

NameFood and Footways

Fingerprint

foodways
death
Food
Jews
clothing
physicians
Ceremonial Behavior
Clothing
Language
Foodways
Danza

Keywords

  • gastronomy
  • food studies
  • Iberian Peninsula
  • Spanish Literature
  • Religion
  • Jewish History
  • Medieval

Cite this

Hamilton, M. M., & Morris, M. (2018). Food and Death: Foodways and Communities in the Danza general de la muerte. In M. Piera (Ed.), Forging communities: Food and representation in medieval and early modern Southwestern Europe (pp. 35-54). (Food and Footways). The University of Arkansas Press.

Food and Death : Foodways and Communities in the Danza general de la muerte. / Hamilton, Michelle M; Morris, María.

Forging communities: Food and representation in medieval and early modern Southwestern Europe . ed. / Montserrat Piera. The University of Arkansas Press, 2018. p. 35-54 (Food and Footways).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Hamilton, MM & Morris, M 2018, Food and Death: Foodways and Communities in the Danza general de la muerte. in M Piera (ed.), Forging communities: Food and representation in medieval and early modern Southwestern Europe . Food and Footways, The University of Arkansas Press, pp. 35-54.
Hamilton MM, Morris M. Food and Death: Foodways and Communities in the Danza general de la muerte. In Piera M, editor, Forging communities: Food and representation in medieval and early modern Southwestern Europe . The University of Arkansas Press. 2018. p. 35-54. (Food and Footways).
Hamilton, Michelle M ; Morris, María. / Food and Death : Foodways and Communities in the Danza general de la muerte. Forging communities: Food and representation in medieval and early modern Southwestern Europe . editor / Montserrat Piera. The University of Arkansas Press, 2018. pp. 35-54 (Food and Footways).
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