Fluticasone propionate aqueous nasal spray compared with terfenadine tablets in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis

E. A. Bronsky, R. J. Dockhorn, E. O. Meltzer, G. Shapiro, H. Boltansky, C. LaForce, J. Ransom, J. M. Weiler, M. Blumenthal, S. Weakley, M. Wisniewski, E. Field, P. Rogenes

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55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Comparative studies with topical corticosteroids and antihistamines for treatment of allergic rhinitis have not always demonstrated clear distinctions between the two on the basis of therapeutic efficacy. Objective: This study was designed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of fluticasone propionate aqueous nasal spray with those of terfenadine in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Methods: Three hundred forty-eight patients with allergic rhinitis were given fluticasone propionate aqueous nasal spray (200 μg once daily), terfenadine tablets (60 mg twice daily), or placebo for 4 weeks in a multicenter, randomized, double- blind, double-dummy, parallel-group study. Results: Clinician-rated total nasal symptom scores after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of therapy and patient-rated total nasal symptom scores throughout treatment were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the fluticasone propionate group compared with the terfenadine group or the placebo group. Terfenadine was riot statistically different from placebo on the basis of clinician-rated nasal symptom scores, except for sneezing. Total nasal airflow, measured by rhinomanometry, significantly (p < 0.05) improved in the fluticasone propionate group compared with the terfenadine group or the placebo group. More fluticasone propionate-treated patients compared with placebo-treated patients had reduced nasal mucosal eosinophil counts after 4 weeks of therapy (p < 0.05). No serious or unusual drug-related adverse events were reported. Morning plasma cortisol concentrations after 4 weeks of therapy did not differ among groups. Conclusion: Fluticasone propionate aqueous nasal spray is more effective than terfenadine tablets for treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-921
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume97
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by Glaxo Research Institute, Research Triangle Park, N.C.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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