First in-vivo human imaging at 10.5T: Imaging the body at 447 MHz

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14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of imaging the human torso and to evaluate the performance of several radiofrequency (RF) management strategies at 10.5T. Methods: Healthy volunteers were imaged on a 10.5T whole-body scanner in multiple target anatomies, including the prostate, hip, kidney, liver, and heart. Phase-only shimming and spoke pulses were used to demonstrate their performance in managing the B+ 1 inhomogeneity present at 447 MHz. Imaging protocols included both qualitative and quantitative acquisitions to show the feasibility of imaging with different contrasts. Results: High-quality images were acquired and demonstrated excellent overall contrast and signal-to-noise ratio. The experimental results matched well with predictions and suggested good translational capabilities of the RF management strategies previously developed at 7T. Phase-only shimming provided increased efficiency, but showed pronounced limitations in homogeneity, demonstrating the need for the increased degrees of freedom made possible through single- and multispoke RF pulse design. Conclusion: The first in-vivo human imaging was successfully performed at 10.5T using previously developed RF management strategies. Further improvement in RF coils, transmit chain, and full integration of parallel transmit functionality are needed to fully realize the benefits of 10.5T.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-303
Number of pages15
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors acknowledge support from the following funding sources: NIBIB P41 EB015894, NIBIB P41 EB027061, and NIH S10 RR029672.

Funding Information:
NIBIB, Grants/Award Numbers: NIBIB P41?EB015894 and NIBIB?P41 EB027061; NIH, Grant/Award Number: S10 RR029672 The authors acknowledge support from the following funding sources: NIBIB P41 EB015894, NIBIB P41 EB027061, and NIH S10 RR029672.

Keywords

  • 10.5T
  • body imaging
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • parallel transmit
  • ultra-high field imaging

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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