Financial Neutrality for Living Organ Donors

Reasoning, Rationale, Definitions, and Implementation Strategies

R. Hays, J. R. Rodrigue, D. Cohen, G. Danovitch, A. Matas, J. Schold, D. LaPointe Rudow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the United States, live organ donation can be a costly and burdensome undertaking for donors. While most donation-related medical expenses are covered, many donors still face lost wages, travel expenses, incidentals, and potential for future insurability problems. Despite widespread consensus that live donors (LD) should not be responsible for the costs associated with donation, little has changed to alleviate financial burdens for LDs in the last decade. To achieve this goal, the transplant community must actively pursue strategies and policies to eliminate unreimbursed out-of-pocket costs to LDs. Costs should be more appropriately distributed across all stakeholders; this will also make live donation possible for people who, in the current system, cannot afford to proceed. We propose the goal of LD “financial neutrality,” offer an operational definition to include the coverage/reimbursement of all medical, travel, and lodging costs, along with lost wages, related to the act of donating an organ, and guidance for consideration of medical care coverage, and wage and other expense reimbursement. The intent of this report is to provide a foundation to inform discussion within the transplant community and to advance initiatives for policy and resource allocation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1973-1981
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Living Donors
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Tissue Donors
Costs and Cost Analysis
Transplants
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Resource Allocation
Health Expenditures

Keywords

  • donors and donation: living
  • economics
  • ethics and public policy
  • kidney transplantation/nephrology
  • kidney transplantation: living donor
  • law/legislation
  • liver transplantation/hepatology
  • liver transplantation: living donor

Cite this

Financial Neutrality for Living Organ Donors : Reasoning, Rationale, Definitions, and Implementation Strategies. / Hays, R.; Rodrigue, J. R.; Cohen, D.; Danovitch, G.; Matas, A.; Schold, J.; LaPointe Rudow, D.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 16, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 1973-1981.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hays, R. ; Rodrigue, J. R. ; Cohen, D. ; Danovitch, G. ; Matas, A. ; Schold, J. ; LaPointe Rudow, D. / Financial Neutrality for Living Organ Donors : Reasoning, Rationale, Definitions, and Implementation Strategies. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 7. pp. 1973-1981.
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