Feasibility of Using an Armband Optical Heart Rate Sensor in Naturalistic Environment

Hang Yu, Michael Kotlyar, Sheena R Dufresne, Paul D Thuras, Serguei Pakhomov

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

Consumer-grade heart rate (HR) sensors including chest straps, wrist-worn watches and rings have become very popular in recent years for tracking individual physiological state, training for sports and even measuring stress levels and emotional changes. While the majority of these consumer sensors are not medical devices, they can still offer insights for consumers and researchers if used correctly taking into account their limitations. Multiple previous studies have been done using a large variety of consumer sensors including Polar® devices, Apple® watches, and Fitbit® wrist bands. The vast majority of prior studies have been done in laboratory settings where collecting data is relatively straightforward. However, using consumer sensors in naturalistic settings that present significant challenges, including noise artefacts and missing data, has not been as extensively investigated. Additionally, the majority of prior studies focused on wrist-worn optical HR sensors. Arm-worn sensors have not been extensively investigated either. In the present study, we validate HR measurements obtained with an arm-worn optical sensor (Polar OH1) against those obtained with a chest-strap electrical sensor (Polar H10) from 16 participants over a 2-week study period in naturalistic settings. We also investigated the impact of physical activity measured with 3-D accelerometers embedded in the H10 chest strap and OH1 armband sensors on the agreement between the two sensors. Overall, we find that the arm-worn optical Polar OH1 sensor provides a good estimate of HR (Pearson r = 0.90, p <0.01). Filtering the signal that corresponds to physical activity further improves the HR estimates but only slightly (Pearson r = 0.91, p <0.01). Based on these preliminary findings, we conclude that the arm-worn Polar OH1 sensor provides usable HR measurements in daily living conditions, with some caveats discussed in the paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-54
Number of pages12
JournalPacific Symposium on Biocomputing
Issue number2023
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023
Event28th Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing, PSB 2023 - Kohala Coast, United States
Duration: Jan 3 2023Jan 7 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments Funded by NIH NIDA award DA049446 and supported by the University of Minnesota CTSI (UL1-TR002494). The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Funding Information:
Funded by NIH NIDA award DA049446 and supported by the University of Minnesota CTSI (UL1-TR002494). The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors.

Keywords

  • Electrocardiography
  • Heart Rate
  • Photoplethysmography
  • Wearable Sensors

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Feasibility of Using an Armband Optical Heart Rate Sensor in Naturalistic Environment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this