Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the effects of flavanoid-rich purple grape juice on the vascular health of childhood cancer survivors: A randomized, controlled crossover trial

Cindy K. Blair, Aaron S. Kelly, Julia Steinberger, Lynn E. Eberly, Char Napurski, Kim Robien, Joseph P. Neglia, Daniel A. Mulrooney, Julie A. Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease following treatment, yet few interventions have been evaluated to reduce this risk. Purple grape juice (pGJ), a rich source of flavonoids with antioxidant properties, has been shown in adults to reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial function. We examined the effects of supplementing meals with pGJ on microvascular endothelial function and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in 24 cancer survivors (ages 10-21 years). Procedure: In a randomized controlled crossover trial consisting of two, 4 week intervention periods, each preceded by a 4 week washout period, subjects received in random order 6 ounces twice daily of pGJ and clear apple juice (cAJ; similar in calories but lower in flavonoids). Measurements were obtained before and after each supplementation period; change was evaluated using mixed effects ANOVA. Results: pGJ did not improve endothelial function, measured using digital reactive hyperemia, compared with cAJ (mean change: pGJ 0.06, cAJ 0.22; difference of mean change [95% CI]: -0.16 [-0.42 - 0.11], P=0.25). No significant changes in plasma concentrations of oxidized-LDL, myeloperoxidase, or high sensitivity C-reactive protein were observed. Conclusion: After 4 weeks of daily consumption of flavonoid-rich pGJ, no measurable change in vascular function was observed in these childhood cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2290-2296
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume61
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Vitis
Cross-Over Studies
Blood Vessels
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health
Flavonoids
Neoplasms
Oxidative Stress
Hyperemia
Malus
C-Reactive Protein
Peroxidase
Meals
Analysis of Variance
Cardiovascular Diseases
Antioxidants
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Childhood cancer survivors
  • Endothelial function
  • Grape juice
  • Intervention

Cite this

@article{77e3bde9b9c146fe91f201e989fe977f,
title = "Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the effects of flavanoid-rich purple grape juice on the vascular health of childhood cancer survivors: A randomized, controlled crossover trial",
abstract = "Background: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease following treatment, yet few interventions have been evaluated to reduce this risk. Purple grape juice (pGJ), a rich source of flavonoids with antioxidant properties, has been shown in adults to reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial function. We examined the effects of supplementing meals with pGJ on microvascular endothelial function and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in 24 cancer survivors (ages 10-21 years). Procedure: In a randomized controlled crossover trial consisting of two, 4 week intervention periods, each preceded by a 4 week washout period, subjects received in random order 6 ounces twice daily of pGJ and clear apple juice (cAJ; similar in calories but lower in flavonoids). Measurements were obtained before and after each supplementation period; change was evaluated using mixed effects ANOVA. Results: pGJ did not improve endothelial function, measured using digital reactive hyperemia, compared with cAJ (mean change: pGJ 0.06, cAJ 0.22; difference of mean change [95{\%} CI]: -0.16 [-0.42 - 0.11], P=0.25). No significant changes in plasma concentrations of oxidized-LDL, myeloperoxidase, or high sensitivity C-reactive protein were observed. Conclusion: After 4 weeks of daily consumption of flavonoid-rich pGJ, no measurable change in vascular function was observed in these childhood cancer survivors.",
keywords = "Cardiovascular disease, Childhood cancer survivors, Endothelial function, Grape juice, Intervention",
author = "Blair, {Cindy K.} and Kelly, {Aaron S.} and Julia Steinberger and Eberly, {Lynn E.} and Char Napurski and Kim Robien and Neglia, {Joseph P.} and Mulrooney, {Daniel A.} and Ross, {Julie A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/pbc.25202",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "61",
pages = "2290--2296",
journal = "Pediatric Blood and Cancer",
issn = "1545-5009",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the effects of flavanoid-rich purple grape juice on the vascular health of childhood cancer survivors

T2 - A randomized, controlled crossover trial

AU - Blair, Cindy K.

AU - Kelly, Aaron S.

AU - Steinberger, Julia

AU - Eberly, Lynn E.

AU - Napurski, Char

AU - Robien, Kim

AU - Neglia, Joseph P.

AU - Mulrooney, Daniel A.

AU - Ross, Julie A.

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Background: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease following treatment, yet few interventions have been evaluated to reduce this risk. Purple grape juice (pGJ), a rich source of flavonoids with antioxidant properties, has been shown in adults to reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial function. We examined the effects of supplementing meals with pGJ on microvascular endothelial function and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in 24 cancer survivors (ages 10-21 years). Procedure: In a randomized controlled crossover trial consisting of two, 4 week intervention periods, each preceded by a 4 week washout period, subjects received in random order 6 ounces twice daily of pGJ and clear apple juice (cAJ; similar in calories but lower in flavonoids). Measurements were obtained before and after each supplementation period; change was evaluated using mixed effects ANOVA. Results: pGJ did not improve endothelial function, measured using digital reactive hyperemia, compared with cAJ (mean change: pGJ 0.06, cAJ 0.22; difference of mean change [95% CI]: -0.16 [-0.42 - 0.11], P=0.25). No significant changes in plasma concentrations of oxidized-LDL, myeloperoxidase, or high sensitivity C-reactive protein were observed. Conclusion: After 4 weeks of daily consumption of flavonoid-rich pGJ, no measurable change in vascular function was observed in these childhood cancer survivors.

AB - Background: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease following treatment, yet few interventions have been evaluated to reduce this risk. Purple grape juice (pGJ), a rich source of flavonoids with antioxidant properties, has been shown in adults to reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial function. We examined the effects of supplementing meals with pGJ on microvascular endothelial function and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in 24 cancer survivors (ages 10-21 years). Procedure: In a randomized controlled crossover trial consisting of two, 4 week intervention periods, each preceded by a 4 week washout period, subjects received in random order 6 ounces twice daily of pGJ and clear apple juice (cAJ; similar in calories but lower in flavonoids). Measurements were obtained before and after each supplementation period; change was evaluated using mixed effects ANOVA. Results: pGJ did not improve endothelial function, measured using digital reactive hyperemia, compared with cAJ (mean change: pGJ 0.06, cAJ 0.22; difference of mean change [95% CI]: -0.16 [-0.42 - 0.11], P=0.25). No significant changes in plasma concentrations of oxidized-LDL, myeloperoxidase, or high sensitivity C-reactive protein were observed. Conclusion: After 4 weeks of daily consumption of flavonoid-rich pGJ, no measurable change in vascular function was observed in these childhood cancer survivors.

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Childhood cancer survivors

KW - Endothelial function

KW - Grape juice

KW - Intervention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84911494358&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84911494358&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/pbc.25202

DO - 10.1002/pbc.25202

M3 - Article

C2 - 25175762

AN - SCOPUS:84911494358

VL - 61

SP - 2290

EP - 2296

JO - Pediatric Blood and Cancer

JF - Pediatric Blood and Cancer

SN - 1545-5009

IS - 12

ER -