Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's Woods

Charles G. Willis, Brad R. Ruhfel, Richard B. Primack, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing, Jonathan B. Losos, Charles C. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invasive species have tremendous detrimental ecological and economic impacts. Climate change may exacerbate species invasions across communities if non-native species are better able to respond to climate changes than native species. Recent evidence indicates that species that respond to climate change by adjusting their phenology (i.e., the timing of seasonal activities, such as flowering) have historically increased in abundance. The extent to which non-native species success is similarly linked to a favorable climate change response, however, remains untested. We analyzed a dataset initiated by the conservationist Henry David Thoreau that documents the long-term phenological response of native and non-native plant species over the last 150 years from Concord, Massachusetts (USA). Our results demonstrate that nonnative species, and invasive species in particular, have been far better able to respond to recent climate change by adjusting their flowering time. This demonstrates that climate change has likely played, and may continue to play, an important role in facilitating non-native species naturalization and invasion at the community level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere8878
JournalPloS one
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 26 2010

Fingerprint

Climate Change
Climate change
Wood
climate change
Introduced Species
invasive species
flowering
economic impact
phenology
indigenous species
Economics

Cite this

Willis, C. G., Ruhfel, B. R., Primack, R. B., Miller-Rushing, A. J., Losos, J. B., & Davis, C. C. (2010). Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's Woods. PloS one, 5(1), [e8878]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0008878

Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's Woods. / Willis, Charles G.; Ruhfel, Brad R.; Primack, Richard B.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Losos, Jonathan B.; Davis, Charles C.

In: PloS one, Vol. 5, No. 1, e8878, 26.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Willis, CG, Ruhfel, BR, Primack, RB, Miller-Rushing, AJ, Losos, JB & Davis, CC 2010, 'Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's Woods', PloS one, vol. 5, no. 1, e8878. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0008878
Willis CG, Ruhfel BR, Primack RB, Miller-Rushing AJ, Losos JB, Davis CC. Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's Woods. PloS one. 2010 Jan 26;5(1). e8878. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0008878
Willis, Charles G. ; Ruhfel, Brad R. ; Primack, Richard B. ; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J. ; Losos, Jonathan B. ; Davis, Charles C. / Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's Woods. In: PloS one. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 1.
@article{24254588db5d413e921f0de09d76aec7,
title = "Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's Woods",
abstract = "Invasive species have tremendous detrimental ecological and economic impacts. Climate change may exacerbate species invasions across communities if non-native species are better able to respond to climate changes than native species. Recent evidence indicates that species that respond to climate change by adjusting their phenology (i.e., the timing of seasonal activities, such as flowering) have historically increased in abundance. The extent to which non-native species success is similarly linked to a favorable climate change response, however, remains untested. We analyzed a dataset initiated by the conservationist Henry David Thoreau that documents the long-term phenological response of native and non-native plant species over the last 150 years from Concord, Massachusetts (USA). Our results demonstrate that nonnative species, and invasive species in particular, have been far better able to respond to recent climate change by adjusting their flowering time. This demonstrates that climate change has likely played, and may continue to play, an important role in facilitating non-native species naturalization and invasion at the community level.",
author = "Willis, {Charles G.} and Ruhfel, {Brad R.} and Primack, {Richard B.} and Miller-Rushing, {Abraham J.} and Losos, {Jonathan B.} and Davis, {Charles C.}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0008878",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's Woods

AU - Willis, Charles G.

AU - Ruhfel, Brad R.

AU - Primack, Richard B.

AU - Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.

AU - Losos, Jonathan B.

AU - Davis, Charles C.

PY - 2010/1/26

Y1 - 2010/1/26

N2 - Invasive species have tremendous detrimental ecological and economic impacts. Climate change may exacerbate species invasions across communities if non-native species are better able to respond to climate changes than native species. Recent evidence indicates that species that respond to climate change by adjusting their phenology (i.e., the timing of seasonal activities, such as flowering) have historically increased in abundance. The extent to which non-native species success is similarly linked to a favorable climate change response, however, remains untested. We analyzed a dataset initiated by the conservationist Henry David Thoreau that documents the long-term phenological response of native and non-native plant species over the last 150 years from Concord, Massachusetts (USA). Our results demonstrate that nonnative species, and invasive species in particular, have been far better able to respond to recent climate change by adjusting their flowering time. This demonstrates that climate change has likely played, and may continue to play, an important role in facilitating non-native species naturalization and invasion at the community level.

AB - Invasive species have tremendous detrimental ecological and economic impacts. Climate change may exacerbate species invasions across communities if non-native species are better able to respond to climate changes than native species. Recent evidence indicates that species that respond to climate change by adjusting their phenology (i.e., the timing of seasonal activities, such as flowering) have historically increased in abundance. The extent to which non-native species success is similarly linked to a favorable climate change response, however, remains untested. We analyzed a dataset initiated by the conservationist Henry David Thoreau that documents the long-term phenological response of native and non-native plant species over the last 150 years from Concord, Massachusetts (USA). Our results demonstrate that nonnative species, and invasive species in particular, have been far better able to respond to recent climate change by adjusting their flowering time. This demonstrates that climate change has likely played, and may continue to play, an important role in facilitating non-native species naturalization and invasion at the community level.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77749282945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77749282945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0008878

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0008878

M3 - Article

C2 - 20126652

AN - SCOPUS:77749282945

VL - 5

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 1

M1 - e8878

ER -