Fate and effects of acetyl cedrene in sediments inhabited by different densities of the deposit feeder, Capitella teleta

Lina Dai, Henriette Selck, Daniel Salvito, Valery E. Forbes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fragrance materials, such as acetyl cedrene (AC), are of environmental concern because they are continuously released to aquatic systems down the drain. In the present study, Capitella teleta (formerly Capitella capitata species I) was exposed to AC-amended sediment at two population densities corresponding to 44,000 and 88,000worms/m2. The fate of AC in systems with worms was compared to that in identical systems without worms. We examined the toxicity of AC on worm survival, growth, and feeding rate, and quantified the fate of AC in exposure systems by mass balance. Worm survival was close to 100% in all treatments. Acetyl cedrene had some positive effects on worm growth, but not feeding, whereas density had negative effects on both growth and feeding rates. After 14 d, the sediment concentration of AC was reduced by 88 to 99% in the presence of worms, whereas sediment AC concentration was reduced by 13 to 31% or less in the absence of worms. Acetyl cedrene was detected in fecal pellets, at low concentrations compared to the initial concentration in the sediment, but not in worm tissue, suggesting that ingested AC is bioavailable to Capitella teleta and that worms can biotransform sediment-associated AC effectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2639-2646
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

Keywords

  • Bioavailability
  • Capitella spp.
  • Fate
  • Fragrance materials
  • Population density

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