Fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight: Cross-sectional and prospective associations in a community sample of working adults

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Abstract

Objective To examine the association between fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight in a community sample of working adults. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analysis of anthropometric, survey and dietary data from adults recruited to participate in a worksite nutrition intervention. Participants self-reported frequency of fast-food consumption per week. Nutrient intakes and diet quality, using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), were computed from dietary recalls collected at baseline and 6 months. Setting Metropolitan medical complex, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Subjects Two hundred adults, aged 18-60 years. Results Cross-sectionally, fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher daily total energy intake (β=72·5, P=0·005), empty calories (β=0·40, P=0·006) and BMI (β=0·73, P=0·011), and lower HEI-2010 score (β=-1·23, P=0·012), total vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·004), whole grains (β=-0·39, P=0·005), fibre (β=-0·83, P=0·002), Mg (β=-6·99, P=0·019) and K (β=-57·5, P=0·016). Over 6 months, change in fast-food consumption was not significantly associated with changes in energy intake or BMI, but was significantly inversely associated with total intake of vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·034). Conclusions Frequency of fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher energy intake and poorer diet quality cross-sectionally. Six-month change in fast-food intake was small, and not significantly associated with overall diet quality or BMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)885-892
Number of pages8
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Fast Foods
Body Weight
Diet
Energy Intake
Vegetables
Workplace
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating
Food

Keywords

  • Adults
  • BMI
  • Diet quality
  • Fast food
  • Healthy Eating Index
  • Nutrient intake
  • Weight

Cite this

@article{38fb731c17b54588aea504a7cf56b086,
title = "Fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight: Cross-sectional and prospective associations in a community sample of working adults",
abstract = "Objective To examine the association between fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight in a community sample of working adults. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analysis of anthropometric, survey and dietary data from adults recruited to participate in a worksite nutrition intervention. Participants self-reported frequency of fast-food consumption per week. Nutrient intakes and diet quality, using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), were computed from dietary recalls collected at baseline and 6 months. Setting Metropolitan medical complex, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Subjects Two hundred adults, aged 18-60 years. Results Cross-sectionally, fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher daily total energy intake (β=72·5, P=0·005), empty calories (β=0·40, P=0·006) and BMI (β=0·73, P=0·011), and lower HEI-2010 score (β=-1·23, P=0·012), total vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·004), whole grains (β=-0·39, P=0·005), fibre (β=-0·83, P=0·002), Mg (β=-6·99, P=0·019) and K (β=-57·5, P=0·016). Over 6 months, change in fast-food consumption was not significantly associated with changes in energy intake or BMI, but was significantly inversely associated with total intake of vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·034). Conclusions Frequency of fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher energy intake and poorer diet quality cross-sectionally. Six-month change in fast-food intake was small, and not significantly associated with overall diet quality or BMI.",
keywords = "Adults, BMI, Diet quality, Fast food, Healthy Eating Index, Nutrient intake, Weight",
author = "Barnes, {Timothy L.} and French, {Simone A.} and Mitchell, {Nathan R.} and Julian Wolfson",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
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language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "885--892",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight

T2 - Cross-sectional and prospective associations in a community sample of working adults

AU - Barnes, Timothy L.

AU - French, Simone A.

AU - Mitchell, Nathan R.

AU - Wolfson, Julian

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - Objective To examine the association between fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight in a community sample of working adults. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analysis of anthropometric, survey and dietary data from adults recruited to participate in a worksite nutrition intervention. Participants self-reported frequency of fast-food consumption per week. Nutrient intakes and diet quality, using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), were computed from dietary recalls collected at baseline and 6 months. Setting Metropolitan medical complex, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Subjects Two hundred adults, aged 18-60 years. Results Cross-sectionally, fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher daily total energy intake (β=72·5, P=0·005), empty calories (β=0·40, P=0·006) and BMI (β=0·73, P=0·011), and lower HEI-2010 score (β=-1·23, P=0·012), total vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·004), whole grains (β=-0·39, P=0·005), fibre (β=-0·83, P=0·002), Mg (β=-6·99, P=0·019) and K (β=-57·5, P=0·016). Over 6 months, change in fast-food consumption was not significantly associated with changes in energy intake or BMI, but was significantly inversely associated with total intake of vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·034). Conclusions Frequency of fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher energy intake and poorer diet quality cross-sectionally. Six-month change in fast-food intake was small, and not significantly associated with overall diet quality or BMI.

AB - Objective To examine the association between fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight in a community sample of working adults. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analysis of anthropometric, survey and dietary data from adults recruited to participate in a worksite nutrition intervention. Participants self-reported frequency of fast-food consumption per week. Nutrient intakes and diet quality, using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), were computed from dietary recalls collected at baseline and 6 months. Setting Metropolitan medical complex, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Subjects Two hundred adults, aged 18-60 years. Results Cross-sectionally, fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher daily total energy intake (β=72·5, P=0·005), empty calories (β=0·40, P=0·006) and BMI (β=0·73, P=0·011), and lower HEI-2010 score (β=-1·23, P=0·012), total vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·004), whole grains (β=-0·39, P=0·005), fibre (β=-0·83, P=0·002), Mg (β=-6·99, P=0·019) and K (β=-57·5, P=0·016). Over 6 months, change in fast-food consumption was not significantly associated with changes in energy intake or BMI, but was significantly inversely associated with total intake of vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·034). Conclusions Frequency of fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher energy intake and poorer diet quality cross-sectionally. Six-month change in fast-food intake was small, and not significantly associated with overall diet quality or BMI.

KW - Adults

KW - BMI

KW - Diet quality

KW - Fast food

KW - Healthy Eating Index

KW - Nutrient intake

KW - Weight

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U2 - 10.1017/S1368980015001871

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M3 - Article

C2 - 26074150

AN - SCOPUS:84960809143

VL - 19

SP - 885

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JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

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