Family structure and adolescent alcohol use problems: Extending popular explanations to American Indians

Tamela Mc Nulty Eitle, Michelle Johnson-Jennings, David J. Eitle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Competing explanations of the relationship between family structure and alcohol use problems are examined using a sample of American Indian adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Living in a single-parent family is found to be a marker for the unequal distribution of stress exposure and parental alcohol use, but the effects of other family structures like non-parent families and the presence of under 21-year-old extended family or non-family members emerge or remain as risk or protective factors for alcohol use problems after a consideration of SES, family processes, peer socialization, and social stress. In particular, a non-parent family structure that has not been considered in prior research emerged as a protective family structure for American Indian adolescent alcohol use problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1467-1479
Number of pages13
JournalSocial Science Research
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Keywords

  • Alcohol use
  • American Indians
  • Family structure
  • Native Americans
  • Stress exposure
  • Substance use

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