Family history of cancer and risk of biliary tract cancers: Results from the biliary tract cancers pooling project

Alison L. Van Dyke, Margaret S. Langhamer, Bin Zhu, Ruth M. Pfeiffer, Demetrius Albanes, Gabriella Andreotti, Laura E.Beane Freeman, Andrew T. Chan, Neal D. Freedman, Susan M. Gapstur, Graham G. Giles, Francine Grodstein, Linda M. Liao, Juhua Luo, Roger L. Milne, Kristine R. Monroe, Marian L. Neuhouser, Jenny N. Poynter, Mark P. Purdue, Kim RobienCatherine Schairer, Rashmi Sinha, Stephanie Weinstein, Xuehong Zhang, Jessica L. Petrick, Katherine A. McGlynn, Peter T. Campbell, Jill Koshiol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Although some familial cancer syndromes include biliary tract cancers (BTCs; cancers of the gallbladder, intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts, and ampulla of Vater), the few studies that have examined the relationships between family history of cancer (FHC) and BTCs have reported inconclusive findings. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations of FHC with risk of BTC in the Biliary Tract Cancers Pooling Project (BiTCaPP). Methods: We used Cox proportional hazards regressions models to estimate HRs and 95% confidence intervals for associations between FHC (any, first-degree, in female relative, in male relative, relative with gastrointestinal cancer, and relative with hormonally related cancer) and BTC risk by anatomic site within the biliary tract, adjusting for sex and race/ethnicity. Sensitivity analyses were conducted that restricted to studies reporting cholecystectomy data and to people without a history of cholecystectomy. Results: Data on FHC were available from 12 prospective studies within BiTCaPP, which collectively contributed 2,246 cases (729 gallbladder, 345 intrahepatic and 615 extrahepatic bile duct, and 385 ampulla of Vater cancers) with 21,706,107 person-years of follow-up. A marginal, inverse association between FHC and gallbladder cancer was driven to the null when analysis was restricted to studies reporting cholecystectomy data and to people without a history of cholecystectomy. FHC was not associated with risk of BTC at the other anatomic sites. Conclusions: These findings do not support an association between FHC and BTCs. Impact: In a study of 1.5 million people, FHC is not a risk factor for BTCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-351
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work and the following coauthors were supported by the Intramural Research Program (IRP) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG; A.L. Van Dyke, M.S. Langhamer, B. Zhu, R.M. Pfeiffer, D. Albanes, G. Andreotti, L.E. Beane Freeman, N.D. Freedman, L. Liao, M.P. Purdue, C. Schairer, R. Sinha, S. Weinstein, J.L. Petrick, K.A. McGlynn, J. Koshiol). The Agricultural Health Study is funded by the IRP of the NIH, NCI (Z01 P010119). The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study is supported by the IRP of DCEG at NCI, part of the NIH. The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study is supported by the Intramural Research Program of the U.S. NCI, NIH, and by U.S. Public Health Service contract HHSN261201500005C from the NCI, Department of Health and Human Services. The Breast Cancer Detection and Demonstration Project is supported by the IRP of NCI, NIH and the American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society funded the Cancer Prevention Studies (CPS), including the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort, as well as S.G. Gapstur and P.T. Campbell. The Health Professionals Follow-up Study: ProspectiveStudies of Diet andCancerin Men and Women, A.T. Chan, and X. Zhang were supported by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS) NCI (CA055075). The Iowa Women's Health Study, K. Robien, and J. Poynter were funded through the EGRP, DCCPS, at NCI (CA039742). The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, G. Giles, and R. Milne were funded by Vic-Health, Cancer Council Victoria, and by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council grants 209057 and 396414.

Funding Information:
This work and the following coauthors were supported by the Intramural Research Program (IRP) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG; A.L. Van Dyke, M.S. Langhamer, B. Zhu, R.M. Pfeiffer, D. Albanes, G. Andreotti, L.E. Beane Freeman, N.D. Freedman, L. Liao, M.P. Purdue, C. Schairer, R. Sinha, S. Weinstein, J.L. Petrick, K.A. McGlynn, J. Koshiol). The Agricultural Health Study is funded by the IRP of the NIH, NCI (Z01 P010119). The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study is supported by the IRP of DCEG at NCI, part of the NIH. The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study is supported by the Intramural Research Program of the U.S. NCI, NIH, and by U.S. Public Health Service contract HHSN261201500005C from the NCI, Department of Health and Human Services. The Breast Cancer Detection and Demonstration Project is supported by the IRP of NCI, NIH and the American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society funded the Cancer Prevention Studies (CPS), including the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort, as well as S.G. Gapstur and P.T. Campbell. The Health Professionals Follow-up Study: Prospective Studies ofDiet and Cancer in Men and Women, A.T. Chan, and X. Zhang were supported by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS) NCI (CA055075). The Iowa Women's Health Study, K. Robien, and J. Poynter were funded through the EGRP, DCCPS, at NCI (CA039742). The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, G. Giles, and R. Milne were funded by Vic-Health, Cancer Council Victoria, and by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council grants 209057 and 396414. Cases and their vital status were ascertained through the Victorian Cancer Registry and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, including the National Death Index and the Australian Cancer Database. Understanding Ethnic Differences in Cancer: The Multiethnic Cohort Study and K.R. Monroe received funding from the NCI (U01 CA164973). The Nurses' Health Study I: Dietary and Hormonal Determinants of Cancer in Women and F. Grodstein received funding through the EGRP, DCCPS, NCI (CA087969 and CA049449). NCI funded the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial through contracts. The Women's Health Initiative, M.L. Neuhouser, and J. Luo are funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NCI, NIH, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through contracts HHSN268201600018C, HHSN268201600001C, HHSN268201600002C, HHSN268201600003C, and HHSN268201600004C. A.T. Chan also received funding from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH (K24 DK098311) and from NCI, NIH (R01 CA137178, R01 CA202704, and R01 CA176272).

Funding Information:
Cases and their vital status were ascertained through the Victorian Cancer Registry and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, including the National Death Index and the Australian Cancer Database. Understanding Ethnic Differences in Cancer: The Multiethnic Cohort Study and K.R. Monroe received funding from the NCI (U01 CA164973). The Nurses' Health Study I: Dietary and Hormonal Determinants of Cancer in Women and F. Grodstein received funding through the EGRP, DCCPS, NCI (CA087969 and CA049449). NCI funded the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial through contracts. The Women's Health Initiative, M.L. Neuhouser, and J. Luo are funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NCI, NIH, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through contracts HHSN268201600018C, HHSN268201600001C, HHSN268201600002C, HHSN268201600003C, and HHSN268201600004C. A.T. Chan also received funding from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH (K24 DK098311) and from NCI, NIH (R01 CA137178, R01 CA202704, and R01 CA176272).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

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