Family cancer caregiving and negative outcomes: The direct and mediational effects of psychosocial resources

Joseph E. Gaugler, Jeanette Linder, Charles W. Given, Ritesh Kataria, Galina Tucker, William F. Regine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that various components of the stress process model were related to negative outcomes (depression, guilt, negative health) in cancer caregivers. This study also tested the hypothesis that psychosocial resources (mastery, socioemotional support) mediated the relationship between the various domains of the stress process model and negative outcomes. A total of 238 cancer caregivers were recruited from radiation medicine clinics at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center (n = 186) and the University of Minnesota Cancer Center (n = 52). A comprehensive interview battery was administered. A multivariate regression found that primary subjective stressors were the strongest predictors of depression and negative health impact. A path analysis indicated that mastery mediated the relationship between role captivity and negative health impact. These results emphasize the importance of multidimensional assessment in cancer caregiving. The findings also suggest refinements to the stress process model when examining family cancer care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-444
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Family Nursing
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Family caregiving
  • Health
  • Mastery
  • Social support

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