Fainting

David G. Benditt, MaryAnn Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fainting is common in humans because the brain resides far above the source of its blood supply (the heart). Any abrupt drop in blood pressure can lead to a faint. Fortunately, the cause is often innocent, and recurrence is infrequent. However, a faint may warn of serious underlying heart disease. In many patients, the physician can distinguish between innocent and serious situations by taking a detailed medical history, carefully reviewing the circumstances of the faint(s), examining the fainter, and perhaps obtaining a heart tracing (ECG) and/or a painless heart imaging test (echocardiogram). On occasion, additional medical tests are needed. Overall, in 80% to 90% of fainters, a likely cause can be established and effective treatment initiated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1048-1050
Number of pages3
JournalCirculation
Volume106
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2002

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