Factors associated with the use of mind body therapies among United States adults with musculoskeletal pain

Hilary A. Tindle, Peter Wolsko, Roger B. Davis, David M. Eisenberg, Russell S. Phillips, Ellen P. McCarthy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of mind body therapy use and correlates of use among adults with prolonged musculoskeletal pain, a group for whom mind body therapies are recommended. Design: The U.S. 1999 National Health Interview Survey. Prolonged musculoskeletal pain was defined as any soft tissue, joint, or bony pain for at least 1 month. Analyses used SUDAAN and reflect national estimates. Main outcome measures: Use of mind body medicine (relaxation techniques, imagery, biofeedback, and hypnosis) and prayer in the previous year. Results: Respondents (n = 6079) with musculoskeletal pain were almost twice as likely as those without (n = 24,722) to use mind body medicine (9% versus 5%, respectively, p < .0001) and prayer (20% versus 12%, respectively, p < .0001). After adjustment, men were less likely than women to use mind body medicine (odds ratio 0.55 [0.43-0.71]) and prayer (odds ratio 0.56 [0.48-0.66]). Those who had a high school education were less likely than those with training beyond high school to use mind body medicine (odds ratio 0.36 [0.28-0.47]) and prayer (odds ratio 0.61 [0.52-0.71]). Conclusions: Mind body therapies are not used commonly by adults with prolonged musculoskeletal pain. Understanding barriers to their use may facilitate wider application in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-164
Number of pages10
JournalComplementary Therapies in Medicine
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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