Factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity

Justin R Ryder, Amy C Gross, Claudia K Fox, A. M. Kaizer, Kyle Rudser, T. M. Jenkins, M. B. Ratcliff, Aaron S Kelly, S. Kirk, R. M. Siegel, T. H. Inge

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Bariatric surgery produces robust weight loss, however, factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance among adolescents undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are unknown.SUBJECTS/METHODS:Fifty adolescents (mean±s.d. age and body mass index (BMI)=17.1±1.7 years and 59±11 kg m -2 ) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, had follow-up visits at 1 year and at a visit between 5 and 12 years following surgery (Follow-up of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at 5 Plus years (FABS-5+) visit; mean±s.d. 8.1±1.6 years). A non-surgical comparison group (n=30; mean±s.d. age and BMI=15.3±1.7 years and BMI=52±8 kg m -2 ) was recruited to compare weight trajectories over time. Questionnaires (health-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, impact of weight on quality of life (QOL), international physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits via surgery guidelines) were administered at the FABS-5+ visit. Post hoc, participants were split into two groups: Long-term weight-loss maintainers (n=23; baseline BMI=58.2 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=35.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=34.9 kg m -2 ) and re-gainers (n=27; baseline BMI=59.8 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=36.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=48.0 kg m -2 ) to compare factors which might contribute to differences. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, baseline diabetes status and length of follow-up.Results:The BMI of the surgical group declined from baseline to 1 year (-38.5±6.9%), which, despite some regain, was largely maintained until FABS-5+ ( -2 9.6±13.9% change). The BMI of the comparison group increased from baseline to the FABS-5+ visit (+10.3±20.6%). When the surgical group was split into maintainers and re-gainers, no differences in weight-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, physical activity/inactivity, or dietary habits were observed between groups. However, at FABS-5+, maintainers had greater overall QOL scores than re-gainers (87.5±10.5 vs 65.4±20.2, P<0.001) and in each QOL sub-domain (P<0.01 all).Conclusions:Long-term weight outcomes for those who underwent weight-loss surgery were superior to those who did not undergo surgical treatment. While no behavioral factors were identified as predictors of success in long-term weight-loss maintenance, greater QOL was strongly associated with maintenance of weight loss among adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-107
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Bariatric Surgery
Morbid Obesity
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
Maintenance
Feeding Behavior
Gastric Bypass
Quality of Life
Weights and Measures
Health
Exercise

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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Factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity. / Ryder, Justin R; Gross, Amy C; Fox, Claudia K; Kaizer, A. M.; Rudser, Kyle; Jenkins, T. M.; Ratcliff, M. B.; Kelly, Aaron S; Kirk, S.; Siegel, R. M.; Inge, T. H.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 102-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity",
abstract = "BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Bariatric surgery produces robust weight loss, however, factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance among adolescents undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are unknown.SUBJECTS/METHODS:Fifty adolescents (mean±s.d. age and body mass index (BMI)=17.1±1.7 years and 59±11 kg m -2 ) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, had follow-up visits at 1 year and at a visit between 5 and 12 years following surgery (Follow-up of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at 5 Plus years (FABS-5+) visit; mean±s.d. 8.1±1.6 years). A non-surgical comparison group (n=30; mean±s.d. age and BMI=15.3±1.7 years and BMI=52±8 kg m -2 ) was recruited to compare weight trajectories over time. Questionnaires (health-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, impact of weight on quality of life (QOL), international physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits via surgery guidelines) were administered at the FABS-5+ visit. Post hoc, participants were split into two groups: Long-term weight-loss maintainers (n=23; baseline BMI=58.2 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=35.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=34.9 kg m -2 ) and re-gainers (n=27; baseline BMI=59.8 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=36.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=48.0 kg m -2 ) to compare factors which might contribute to differences. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, baseline diabetes status and length of follow-up.Results:The BMI of the surgical group declined from baseline to 1 year (-38.5±6.9{\%}), which, despite some regain, was largely maintained until FABS-5+ ( -2 9.6±13.9{\%} change). The BMI of the comparison group increased from baseline to the FABS-5+ visit (+10.3±20.6{\%}). When the surgical group was split into maintainers and re-gainers, no differences in weight-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, physical activity/inactivity, or dietary habits were observed between groups. However, at FABS-5+, maintainers had greater overall QOL scores than re-gainers (87.5±10.5 vs 65.4±20.2, P<0.001) and in each QOL sub-domain (P<0.01 all).Conclusions:Long-term weight outcomes for those who underwent weight-loss surgery were superior to those who did not undergo surgical treatment. While no behavioral factors were identified as predictors of success in long-term weight-loss maintenance, greater QOL was strongly associated with maintenance of weight loss among adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery surgery.",
author = "Ryder, {Justin R} and Gross, {Amy C} and Fox, {Claudia K} and Kaizer, {A. M.} and Kyle Rudser and Jenkins, {T. M.} and Ratcliff, {M. B.} and Kelly, {Aaron S} and S. Kirk and Siegel, {R. M.} and Inge, {T. H.}",
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T1 - Factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity

AU - Ryder, Justin R

AU - Gross, Amy C

AU - Fox, Claudia K

AU - Kaizer, A. M.

AU - Rudser, Kyle

AU - Jenkins, T. M.

AU - Ratcliff, M. B.

AU - Kelly, Aaron S

AU - Kirk, S.

AU - Siegel, R. M.

AU - Inge, T. H.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Bariatric surgery produces robust weight loss, however, factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance among adolescents undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are unknown.SUBJECTS/METHODS:Fifty adolescents (mean±s.d. age and body mass index (BMI)=17.1±1.7 years and 59±11 kg m -2 ) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, had follow-up visits at 1 year and at a visit between 5 and 12 years following surgery (Follow-up of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at 5 Plus years (FABS-5+) visit; mean±s.d. 8.1±1.6 years). A non-surgical comparison group (n=30; mean±s.d. age and BMI=15.3±1.7 years and BMI=52±8 kg m -2 ) was recruited to compare weight trajectories over time. Questionnaires (health-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, impact of weight on quality of life (QOL), international physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits via surgery guidelines) were administered at the FABS-5+ visit. Post hoc, participants were split into two groups: Long-term weight-loss maintainers (n=23; baseline BMI=58.2 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=35.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=34.9 kg m -2 ) and re-gainers (n=27; baseline BMI=59.8 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=36.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=48.0 kg m -2 ) to compare factors which might contribute to differences. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, baseline diabetes status and length of follow-up.Results:The BMI of the surgical group declined from baseline to 1 year (-38.5±6.9%), which, despite some regain, was largely maintained until FABS-5+ ( -2 9.6±13.9% change). The BMI of the comparison group increased from baseline to the FABS-5+ visit (+10.3±20.6%). When the surgical group was split into maintainers and re-gainers, no differences in weight-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, physical activity/inactivity, or dietary habits were observed between groups. However, at FABS-5+, maintainers had greater overall QOL scores than re-gainers (87.5±10.5 vs 65.4±20.2, P<0.001) and in each QOL sub-domain (P<0.01 all).Conclusions:Long-term weight outcomes for those who underwent weight-loss surgery were superior to those who did not undergo surgical treatment. While no behavioral factors were identified as predictors of success in long-term weight-loss maintenance, greater QOL was strongly associated with maintenance of weight loss among adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery surgery.

AB - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Bariatric surgery produces robust weight loss, however, factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance among adolescents undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are unknown.SUBJECTS/METHODS:Fifty adolescents (mean±s.d. age and body mass index (BMI)=17.1±1.7 years and 59±11 kg m -2 ) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, had follow-up visits at 1 year and at a visit between 5 and 12 years following surgery (Follow-up of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at 5 Plus years (FABS-5+) visit; mean±s.d. 8.1±1.6 years). A non-surgical comparison group (n=30; mean±s.d. age and BMI=15.3±1.7 years and BMI=52±8 kg m -2 ) was recruited to compare weight trajectories over time. Questionnaires (health-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, impact of weight on quality of life (QOL), international physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits via surgery guidelines) were administered at the FABS-5+ visit. Post hoc, participants were split into two groups: Long-term weight-loss maintainers (n=23; baseline BMI=58.2 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=35.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=34.9 kg m -2 ) and re-gainers (n=27; baseline BMI=59.8 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=36.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=48.0 kg m -2 ) to compare factors which might contribute to differences. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, baseline diabetes status and length of follow-up.Results:The BMI of the surgical group declined from baseline to 1 year (-38.5±6.9%), which, despite some regain, was largely maintained until FABS-5+ ( -2 9.6±13.9% change). The BMI of the comparison group increased from baseline to the FABS-5+ visit (+10.3±20.6%). When the surgical group was split into maintainers and re-gainers, no differences in weight-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, physical activity/inactivity, or dietary habits were observed between groups. However, at FABS-5+, maintainers had greater overall QOL scores than re-gainers (87.5±10.5 vs 65.4±20.2, P<0.001) and in each QOL sub-domain (P<0.01 all).Conclusions:Long-term weight outcomes for those who underwent weight-loss surgery were superior to those who did not undergo surgical treatment. While no behavioral factors were identified as predictors of success in long-term weight-loss maintenance, greater QOL was strongly associated with maintenance of weight loss among adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery surgery.

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