Factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity

J. R. Ryder, A. C. Gross, C. K. Fox, A. M. Kaizer, K. D. Rudser, T. M. Jenkins, M. B. Ratcliff, A. S. Kelly, S. Kirk, R. M. Siegel, T. H. Inge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Bariatric surgery produces robust weight loss, however, factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance among adolescents undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are unknown.SUBJECTS/METHODS:Fifty adolescents (mean±s.d. age and body mass index (BMI)=17.1±1.7 years and 59±11 kg m -2 ) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, had follow-up visits at 1 year and at a visit between 5 and 12 years following surgery (Follow-up of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at 5 Plus years (FABS-5+) visit; mean±s.d. 8.1±1.6 years). A non-surgical comparison group (n=30; mean±s.d. age and BMI=15.3±1.7 years and BMI=52±8 kg m -2 ) was recruited to compare weight trajectories over time. Questionnaires (health-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, impact of weight on quality of life (QOL), international physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits via surgery guidelines) were administered at the FABS-5+ visit. Post hoc, participants were split into two groups: Long-term weight-loss maintainers (n=23; baseline BMI=58.2 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=35.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=34.9 kg m -2 ) and re-gainers (n=27; baseline BMI=59.8 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=36.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=48.0 kg m -2 ) to compare factors which might contribute to differences. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, baseline diabetes status and length of follow-up.Results:The BMI of the surgical group declined from baseline to 1 year (-38.5±6.9%), which, despite some regain, was largely maintained until FABS-5+ ( -2 9.6±13.9% change). The BMI of the comparison group increased from baseline to the FABS-5+ visit (+10.3±20.6%). When the surgical group was split into maintainers and re-gainers, no differences in weight-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, physical activity/inactivity, or dietary habits were observed between groups. However, at FABS-5+, maintainers had greater overall QOL scores than re-gainers (87.5±10.5 vs 65.4±20.2, P<0.001) and in each QOL sub-domain (P<0.01 all).Conclusions:Long-term weight outcomes for those who underwent weight-loss surgery were superior to those who did not undergo surgical treatment. While no behavioral factors were identified as predictors of success in long-term weight-loss maintenance, greater QOL was strongly associated with maintenance of weight loss among adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-107
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Bariatric Surgery
Morbid Obesity
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
Maintenance
Feeding Behavior
Gastric Bypass
Quality of Life
Weights and Measures
Health
Exercise

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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Factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity. / Ryder, J. R.; Gross, A. C.; Fox, C. K.; Kaizer, A. M.; Rudser, K. D.; Jenkins, T. M.; Ratcliff, M. B.; Kelly, A. S.; Kirk, S.; Siegel, R. M.; Inge, T. H.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 102-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity",
abstract = "BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Bariatric surgery produces robust weight loss, however, factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance among adolescents undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are unknown.SUBJECTS/METHODS:Fifty adolescents (mean±s.d. age and body mass index (BMI)=17.1±1.7 years and 59±11 kg m -2 ) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, had follow-up visits at 1 year and at a visit between 5 and 12 years following surgery (Follow-up of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at 5 Plus years (FABS-5+) visit; mean±s.d. 8.1±1.6 years). A non-surgical comparison group (n=30; mean±s.d. age and BMI=15.3±1.7 years and BMI=52±8 kg m -2 ) was recruited to compare weight trajectories over time. Questionnaires (health-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, impact of weight on quality of life (QOL), international physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits via surgery guidelines) were administered at the FABS-5+ visit. Post hoc, participants were split into two groups: Long-term weight-loss maintainers (n=23; baseline BMI=58.2 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=35.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=34.9 kg m -2 ) and re-gainers (n=27; baseline BMI=59.8 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=36.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=48.0 kg m -2 ) to compare factors which might contribute to differences. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, baseline diabetes status and length of follow-up.Results:The BMI of the surgical group declined from baseline to 1 year (-38.5±6.9{\%}), which, despite some regain, was largely maintained until FABS-5+ ( -2 9.6±13.9{\%} change). The BMI of the comparison group increased from baseline to the FABS-5+ visit (+10.3±20.6{\%}). When the surgical group was split into maintainers and re-gainers, no differences in weight-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, physical activity/inactivity, or dietary habits were observed between groups. However, at FABS-5+, maintainers had greater overall QOL scores than re-gainers (87.5±10.5 vs 65.4±20.2, P<0.001) and in each QOL sub-domain (P<0.01 all).Conclusions:Long-term weight outcomes for those who underwent weight-loss surgery were superior to those who did not undergo surgical treatment. While no behavioral factors were identified as predictors of success in long-term weight-loss maintenance, greater QOL was strongly associated with maintenance of weight loss among adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery surgery.",
author = "Ryder, {J. R.} and Gross, {A. C.} and Fox, {C. K.} and Kaizer, {A. M.} and Rudser, {K. D.} and Jenkins, {T. M.} and Ratcliff, {M. B.} and Kelly, {A. S.} and S. Kirk and Siegel, {R. M.} and Inge, {T. H.}",
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T1 - Factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity

AU - Ryder, J. R.

AU - Gross, A. C.

AU - Fox, C. K.

AU - Kaizer, A. M.

AU - Rudser, K. D.

AU - Jenkins, T. M.

AU - Ratcliff, M. B.

AU - Kelly, A. S.

AU - Kirk, S.

AU - Siegel, R. M.

AU - Inge, T. H.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Bariatric surgery produces robust weight loss, however, factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance among adolescents undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are unknown.SUBJECTS/METHODS:Fifty adolescents (mean±s.d. age and body mass index (BMI)=17.1±1.7 years and 59±11 kg m -2 ) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, had follow-up visits at 1 year and at a visit between 5 and 12 years following surgery (Follow-up of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at 5 Plus years (FABS-5+) visit; mean±s.d. 8.1±1.6 years). A non-surgical comparison group (n=30; mean±s.d. age and BMI=15.3±1.7 years and BMI=52±8 kg m -2 ) was recruited to compare weight trajectories over time. Questionnaires (health-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, impact of weight on quality of life (QOL), international physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits via surgery guidelines) were administered at the FABS-5+ visit. Post hoc, participants were split into two groups: Long-term weight-loss maintainers (n=23; baseline BMI=58.2 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=35.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=34.9 kg m -2 ) and re-gainers (n=27; baseline BMI=59.8 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=36.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=48.0 kg m -2 ) to compare factors which might contribute to differences. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, baseline diabetes status and length of follow-up.Results:The BMI of the surgical group declined from baseline to 1 year (-38.5±6.9%), which, despite some regain, was largely maintained until FABS-5+ ( -2 9.6±13.9% change). The BMI of the comparison group increased from baseline to the FABS-5+ visit (+10.3±20.6%). When the surgical group was split into maintainers and re-gainers, no differences in weight-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, physical activity/inactivity, or dietary habits were observed between groups. However, at FABS-5+, maintainers had greater overall QOL scores than re-gainers (87.5±10.5 vs 65.4±20.2, P<0.001) and in each QOL sub-domain (P<0.01 all).Conclusions:Long-term weight outcomes for those who underwent weight-loss surgery were superior to those who did not undergo surgical treatment. While no behavioral factors were identified as predictors of success in long-term weight-loss maintenance, greater QOL was strongly associated with maintenance of weight loss among adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery surgery.

AB - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Bariatric surgery produces robust weight loss, however, factors associated with long-term weight-loss maintenance among adolescents undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are unknown.SUBJECTS/METHODS:Fifty adolescents (mean±s.d. age and body mass index (BMI)=17.1±1.7 years and 59±11 kg m -2 ) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, had follow-up visits at 1 year and at a visit between 5 and 12 years following surgery (Follow-up of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery at 5 Plus years (FABS-5+) visit; mean±s.d. 8.1±1.6 years). A non-surgical comparison group (n=30; mean±s.d. age and BMI=15.3±1.7 years and BMI=52±8 kg m -2 ) was recruited to compare weight trajectories over time. Questionnaires (health-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, impact of weight on quality of life (QOL), international physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits via surgery guidelines) were administered at the FABS-5+ visit. Post hoc, participants were split into two groups: Long-term weight-loss maintainers (n=23; baseline BMI=58.2 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=35.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=34.9 kg m -2 ) and re-gainers (n=27; baseline BMI=59.8 kg m -2 ; 1-year BMI=36.8 kg m -2 ; FABS-5+ BMI=48.0 kg m -2 ) to compare factors which might contribute to differences. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, baseline diabetes status and length of follow-up.Results:The BMI of the surgical group declined from baseline to 1 year (-38.5±6.9%), which, despite some regain, was largely maintained until FABS-5+ ( -2 9.6±13.9% change). The BMI of the comparison group increased from baseline to the FABS-5+ visit (+10.3±20.6%). When the surgical group was split into maintainers and re-gainers, no differences in weight-related and eating behaviors, health responsibility, physical activity/inactivity, or dietary habits were observed between groups. However, at FABS-5+, maintainers had greater overall QOL scores than re-gainers (87.5±10.5 vs 65.4±20.2, P<0.001) and in each QOL sub-domain (P<0.01 all).Conclusions:Long-term weight outcomes for those who underwent weight-loss surgery were superior to those who did not undergo surgical treatment. While no behavioral factors were identified as predictors of success in long-term weight-loss maintenance, greater QOL was strongly associated with maintenance of weight loss among adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery surgery.

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