Factors associated with health-related quality of life, hip function, and health utility after operative management of femoral neck fractures

FAITH Investigators, S. Sprague, M. Bhandari, M. J. Heetveld, S. Liew, T. Scott, S. Bzovsky, D. Heels-Ansdell, Q. Zhou, M. Swiontkowski, Sarah A Anderson, E. H. Schemitsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims The primary aim of this prognostic study was to identify baseline factors associated with physical health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients after a femoral neck fracture. The secondary aims were to identify baseline factors associated with mental HRQL, hip function, and health utility. Patients and Methods Patients who were enrolled in the Fixation using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip Fractures (FAITH) trial completed the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, and EuroQol 5-Dimension at regular intervals for 24 months. We conducted multilevel mixed models to identify factors potentially associated with HRQL. Results The following were associated with lower physical HRQL: Older age (-1.42 for every ten-year increase, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.17 to -0.67, p < 0.001); female gender (-1.52, 95% CI - 3.00 to -0.05, p = 0.04); higher body mass index (-0.69 for every five-point increase, 95% CI - 1.36 to -0.02, p = 0.04); American Society of Anesthesiologists class III (versus class I) (-3.19, 95% CI -5.73 to -0.66, p = 0.01); and sustaining a displaced fracture (-2.18, 95% CI -3.88 to - 0.49, p = 0.01). Additional factors were associated with mental HRQL, hip function, and health utility. Conclusion We identified several baseline factors associated with lower HRQL, hip function, and utility after a femoral neck fracture. These findings may be used by clinicians to inform treatment and outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-369
Number of pages9
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume100B
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Data for this study was provided by the FAITH trial. The FAITH trial was supported by research grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (MOP-106630 and MCT-87771), National Institutes of Health (1R01AR055267-01A1), Stichting NutsOhra (SNO-T-0602-43), the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (80-82310-97-11032), Physicians’ Services Incorporated. Dr. Bhandari was also funded, in part, through the Early Research Award Program, which provided funding for the present study, as well as by a Canada Research Chair in Musculoskeletal Trauma, which is unrelated to the present study (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada).

Funding Information:
The FAITH trial was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01AR055267-01A1. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The FAITH trial was also supported by The County Durham & Tees Valley Comprehensive Local Research Network, which operates as part of the National Institute for Health Research Comprehensive Clinical Research Network in England. The funding sources had no role in: designing or conducting the FAITH study; the collection, management, analysis, or interpretation of the data; or the preparation, review, or approval of the FAITH manuscript.

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