Factors affecting hospital charges and length of stay from teenage motor vehicle crash-related hospitalizations among United States teenagers, 2002-2007

Corinne Peek-Asa, Jingzhen Yang, Marizen Ramirez, Cara Hamann, Gang Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for all teenagers, and each year a far greater number of teens are hospitalized with non-fatal injuries. This retrospective cohort study used the National Inpatient Sample data to examine hospitalizations from the years 2002 to 2007 for 15-18-year-old teenagers who had been admitted due to a motor vehicle crash. More than 23,000 teens were hospitalized for motor vehicle-related crash injuries each year, for a total of 139,880 over the 6-year period. Total hospital charges exceeded $1 billion almost every year, with a median hospital charge of more than $25,000. Older teens, boys, those with fractures, internal injuries or intracranial injuries, and Medicaid/Medicare as a payer were associated with higher hospital charges and longer lengths of stay. These high charges and hospitalization periods pose a significant burden on teens, their families, and the health care system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)595-600
Number of pages6
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

Keywords

  • Hospitalization charges
  • Motor vehicle crash
  • Outcome study
  • Teenage driver

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