Facilitators, barriers, and components of a culturally tailored afterschool physical activity program in preadolescent African American girls and their mothers

Sofiya Alhassan, Cory Greever, Ogechi Nwaokelemeh, Albert Mendoza, Daheia J. Barr-Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Traditional physical activity (PA) programs have not been effective in increasing PA in African American girls. Currently, there is limited information regarding the components of PA programs that drive participation in African American girls. The purpose of our investigation was to describe the facilitators, barriers, and components of a culturally tailored afterschool PA program that will potentially inspire the participation of African American mother-daughter dyads. Methods: Six focus groups (n=12 mother-daughter dyads; daughters, 7-10 yrs in age) were conducted between March and May 2012. Focus group semi-structured interviews were transcribed, coded, and systematically analyzed using NVivo. Results: Mothers reported a preference for non-traditional (dancing, household chores) types of PA. While daughters preferred to participate in both dance-based and traditional types (walking, riding bikes) of PA. Participants felt that the use of a culturally tailored dance program would be appealing because it highlights the cultural and historical legacy of the African American culture. Mothers wanted programs that would allow them time to spend with their daughters. Top three dance styles that mothers wanted to participate in were African, hip-hop, and Salsa/samba, while daughters reported that they would enjoy participating in hip-hop, African, and jazz. The most common responses given for resources needed for participating in a culturally tailored afterschool dance program were the location of the program, transportation, and childcare for siblings. Conclusions: Our investigation highlights some cultural factors related to facilitators and barriers of PA that should be addressed in designing PA studies for African American girls and their mothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-13
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume24
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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African Americans
Dancing
Nuclear Family
Mothers
Exercise
Humulus
Focus Groups
Hip
Walking
Siblings
Interviews

Keywords

  • African American
  • Mother-daughter dyads
  • Physical activity
  • Qualitative study

Cite this

Facilitators, barriers, and components of a culturally tailored afterschool physical activity program in preadolescent African American girls and their mothers. / Alhassan, Sofiya; Greever, Cory; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Mendoza, Albert; Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.12.2014, p. 8-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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