Extracting aerodynamic coefficients using direct trajectory sampling

Matthew Rhinehart, Bernard Mettler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe a technique to extract aerodynamic characteristics of an aircraft directly from collected trajectories. The technique was developed to investigate the low Reynold's number regime of centimeter-scale aircraft which represents a largely unstudied domain of aerodynamics and for which traditional techniques have produced limited results. This technique takes advantage of a vision tracking system that dispenses with any on-board navigation sensors and the stationary atmospheric conditions prevailing in the indoor flight experiment facility used to collect flight data. The aircraft is fitted with reflective markers on its wing, fuselage, and empennage. A broad variety of trajectories spanning the natural flight envelope were collected by hand launching the aircraft. Aerodynamic forces and moments can be determined from the vehicle's inertial acceleration; the aerodynamic angles can be determined from the vehicle's kinematics. Combining these data we can determine the aerodynamic coefficients. The results are then validated using a six degree-of-freedom model. This technique complements the traditional wind-tunnel techniques and numerical analysis tools. Thanks to its practical qualities, this technique could be useful to other fluid dynamic problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
EventAIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit - Honolulu, HI, United States
Duration: Aug 18 2008Aug 21 2008

Publication series

NameAIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit

Other

OtherAIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit
CountryUnited States
CityHonolulu, HI
Period8/18/088/21/08

Fingerprint

Aerodynamics
Trajectories
Sampling
Aircraft
Empennages
Flight envelopes
Fuselages
Launching
Fluid dynamics
Wind tunnels
Numerical analysis
Kinematics
Navigation
Reynolds number
Sensors
Experiments

Cite this

Rhinehart, M., & Mettler, B. (2008). Extracting aerodynamic coefficients using direct trajectory sampling. In AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit [2008-6899] (AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit).

Extracting aerodynamic coefficients using direct trajectory sampling. / Rhinehart, Matthew; Mettler, Bernard.

AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit. 2008. 2008-6899 (AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rhinehart, M & Mettler, B 2008, Extracting aerodynamic coefficients using direct trajectory sampling. in AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit., 2008-6899, AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit, AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit, Honolulu, HI, United States, 8/18/08.
Rhinehart M, Mettler B. Extracting aerodynamic coefficients using direct trajectory sampling. In AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit. 2008. 2008-6899. (AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit).
Rhinehart, Matthew ; Mettler, Bernard. / Extracting aerodynamic coefficients using direct trajectory sampling. AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit. 2008. (AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit).
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