Extracellular Matrix Microparticles Improve GelMA Bioink Resolution for 3D Bioprinting at Ambient Temperature

Zachary Galliger, Caleb D Vogt, Haylie R. Helms, Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Current bioinks for 3D bioprinting, such as gelatin-methacryloyl, are generally low viscosity fluids at room temperature, requiring specialized systems to create complex geometries. Methods and Results: Adding decellularized extracellular matrix microparticles derived from porcine tracheal cartilage to gelatin-methacryloyl creates a yield stress fluid capable of forming self-supporting structures. This bioink blend performs similarly at 25 °C to gelatin-methacryloyl alone at 15 °C in linear resolution, print fidelity, and tensile mechanics. Conclusion: This method lowers barriers to manufacturing complex tissue geometries and removes the need for cooling systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2200196
JournalMacromolecular Materials and Engineering
Volume307
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors acknowledge the Visible Heart Lab for porcine tissue donation, the UMN Polymer Characterization Facility, the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics, and the UMN 3D Bioprinting Facility. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health NHLBI F31 (5F31HL142313) awarded to Z.P.G., a CTSI Translational Research Development Program grant awarded to Z.P.G. (from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences grant UL1TR002494. PI: B. Blazar. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.), the T32 (5T32HL007741) training grant for C.D.V. (Training in Pulmonary Science, PI: D. Ingbar), and non‐sponsored funds (A.P.‐M.).

Funding Information:
The authors acknowledge the Visible Heart Lab for porcine tissue donation, the UMN Polymer Characterization Facility, the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics, and the UMN 3D Bioprinting Facility. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health NHLBI F31 (5F31HL142313) awarded to Z.P.G., a CTSI Translational Research Development Program grant awarded to Z.P.G. (from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences grant UL1TR002494. PI: B. Blazar. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.), the T32 (5T32HL007741) training grant for C.D.V. (Training in Pulmonary Science, PI: D. Ingbar), and non-sponsored funds (A.P.-M.).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Macromolecular Materials and Engineering published by Wiley-VCH GmbH.

Keywords

  • 3D bioprinting
  • extracellular matrix
  • hydrogels
  • larynx
  • tissue engineering
  • trachea

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